Posts Tagged ‘outside’

  • Petland Urges Safety When Handling Any Puppy


    “Regardless of where they come from, any puppy and dog can carry Campylobacter germs.” 

    According to the CDC, nearly 1.3 million people in the United States are affected each year by Campylobacter.  Petland is concerned to hear that 39 of these cases, or .0003-percent of all infections in the nation, were identified as having a likely connection with a Petland puppy. The health and wellbeing of our pets, staff and customers is Petland’s utmost priority and concern.

     

    Petland is committed and stands ready to assist in identifying any possible link between our pets and this bacterial infection.  Petland has requested but has not been given any information from the CDC or any other health department offices related to the dates, stores, or cities where the 39 infection cases allegedly originated. We have also not been provided any information or location of any employees affected.

     

    Petland has resources ready to deploy once we are given case specific information from the CDC.  The only information we have is the limited information shared with us from the CDC. Prior to the public notification from the CDC, Petland had not been contacted by any customers or employees regarding a confirmed or diagnosed human campylobacter infection after visiting a Petland store or from a Petland puppy.

     

    About Campylobacter

    Campylobacter is a common germ that can be spread in homes, parks, zoos, doggie daycares, boarding facilities, animal shelters, rescue groups and more. As stated by the CDC, “Campylobacter is one of the most common causes of diarrheal illness in the United States.”  CDC further states, “Most cases of campylobacteriosis are associated with eating raw or undercooked poultry meat or from cross-contamination of other foods by these items.”

     

    As it relates to human contamination by dogs, the CDC states “Regardless of where they come from, any puppy and dog can carry Campylobacter germs.”  In fact, a 2017 study by Texas A&M identified the “prevalence of fecal campylobacter shedding among sampled dogs was 75.7%.” The study states “approximately 70% of campylobacter-positive dogs had grossly normal feces.”

     

    PetMd states “Up to 49 percent of dogs carry campylobacteriosis, shedding it into their feces for other animals to contract.  Because of this, humans can contract the disease if they do not practice proper hygiene after coming into contact with infected animals.”

     

    The VCA Hospital website states “research has shown that campylobacter organisms can be isolated from both healthy and sick dogs.”

     

    Regardless of the widely-known threats of campylobacter contamination from dogs from various sources, Petland finds itself the focus of a national inquiry from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and state health departments with hundreds of media reports targeting Petland alone while Petland remains in the dark on any information related to these 39 cases.

     

    Tips for preventing infection

    Proper Hand-washing Techniques

    1. Wet your hands with running water — either warm or cold.
    2. Apply liquid, bar or powder soap.
    3. Lather well.
    4. Rub your hands vigorously for at least 20 seconds.
    5. Rinse well.
    6. Dry your hands with a clean or disposable towel or air dryer.
    7. If possible, use a towel or your elbow to turn off the faucet.
    8. If soap and water are not immediately available, use hand sanitizer until you can properly wash.
    9. Adults should monitor children while washing their hands.

     

    If you have a specific personal concern relating to the possibility of contracting the bacteria, please call our help line at 877-658-5155.

     

    We look forward to our continued work with the CDC and will provide any further updates as they become available.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28371319

    http://www.petmd.com/dog/conditions/digestive/c_multi_campylobacteriosis

    https://vcahospitals.com/know-your-pet/campylobacter-infection-in-dogs

    https://www.cdc.gov/campylobacter/index.html

     

    Petland, Inc. is a franchise operation with quality, full service retail pet centers across the United States, Canada, China, Mexico, South Africa, Brazil and El Salvador.

    For 50 years, Petland Pet Counselors have been dedicated to matching the right pet with the right customer and meeting the needs of both. To its customers who already have pets, Petland is dedicated to enhancing their knowledge and enjoyment of the human-animal bond.

    Petland was founded in 1967 and is headquartered in south central Ohio. For more information on Petland, visit www.petland.com.

  • 4 Training Mistakes You Could Be Unintentionally Making with Your Pooch!

    There are several things we as puppy parents unintentionally do that mess with our dogs’ emotions. No matter how hard we try in our effort to be perfect, some of our human ways can lead to one confused pup. And sending mixed signals to our pups will make them more likely to misbehave. But is it really bad behavior, or just bad communication?

    1. “COME HERE NOW!”

    How many of you have called to your dog and a wild west standoff ensues? Well, what exactly are you calling them for? We often expect our pups to come even when they know there’s no incentive to do so. Instead, ensure that “come” works every time by rewarding your dog with a puppy party every time they obey this all-important command. The key-word here is reward. Puppy parties should involve anything your dog finds rewarding–a nice belly rub, a yummy treat, their favorite toy, etc. Never punish your dog for coming when called. Even if your dog is coming back after an hour-long escapade through the neighborhood, they still get a puppy party. Remember to always issue a recall command with a pleasant tone and a smile on your face; no dog wants to come running to an angry tone and a scowling face.

    2. Back Talk

    Petting, talking to, playing with, and even scolding a barking dog, reinforces the dog to bark. Do not give a dog attention while they’re barking. The best remedy to a Barking Betsy is the good ole’ cold shoulder. And don’t forget to praise the peace and reward Betsy when she is being quiet! Remember, barking can be inherently rewarding for some dogs, especially for many smaller breeds. Make sure the reward you give your dog is more rewarding then the barking itself. You may have to test out several treats and toys to find out what your pup goes absolutely bananas for.

    3. Chew On This, Not That!

    Dogs don’t just have a desire to chew, they have a need to chew! Providing your dog with plenty of chew toys is the first step, but unfortunately not the last. Dogs need constant reminding of what is okay to chew and what isn’t. Keep anything you don’t want your dog to chew off the floor! If you do catch your dog chewing on something off-limits, redirect him with a few cues (sit, down, touch), and then replace the item with one of their chew toys.

    4. Nipping Enabler

    Mouthy puppies can be sweet and funny when they are little, but nipping can become dangerous fast. Don’t allow your dog to make teeth-to-skin contact with anyone, ever. When dogs first learn how to play, their litter mates and mother teach them what an acceptable mouthing pressure is, and what kind of wrestling is tolerated among other dogs. As a puppy parent, it is your job to teach your dog the appropriate way to play with humans. Even if it’s a playful accident, let your dog know that nipping isn’t okay by exclaiming “OUCH!” and by walking away. Don’t play with your pup for fifteen to thirty seconds. Your dog will soon figure out that if they don’t play appropriately, the game will end.

    We hope this blog was helpful to any who might be making some training missteps and not even realizing it! At Petland, we also pride ourselves on being a fount of information when it comes to properly training a new puppy as well as continuing that training into doggy adulthood! Stop in today if you’ve got a training issue to tackle, we’ve got the knowledge, treats and toys to help you on your way to becoming a better pet parent!

     

  • 3 Things You Should Do To Make Sure Your Dog Never Gets Lost

    This past January I experienced the longest five seconds of my life. I fastened a leash on my French Bulldog. I took him out of the car. I turned back to the car to grab something. Then I noticed that the leash was not connected to my dog.

    I yelled “Oh no! Jameson!” I whipped around to find him so close behind me that I almost tripped over him. He was standing there like it was no big deal. He couldn’t figure out why I was smothering him with hugs.

    One-third of pets will get lost in their lifetime. Even more startling, 10 million pets get lost each year. That’s larger than the population of New York City.

    Due to lack of microchipping and proper identification, 90% of these beloved animals will never return to their humans.

    There’s no way around it, those stats are freaking scary. There are things you can do to prevent your pup from becoming a statistic.

    1. Microchip your dog.

    This is possibly the most important thing that you can do for your best friend. If your dog gets lost, rescuers can identify your pup, and you, via a unique identification code. They’re not only helpful for lost dogs, they can also help to return stolen pups to their rightful families. Make sure you keep your microchip records up to date with your current address and phone number.

    2. Keep tags on your dog at all times.

    Many pups don’t wear collars indoors. If you have a bolter, then your BFF could end up out in the wilderness with no way to tell the world where they live. An accurate dog tag, with your contact information, will help good Samaritans contact you if they find your pup.

    Remember, 90% of shelter pups don’t find their way home because rescuers can’t track down their original family.

    3. Make a DIY dog collar.

    There are options for identification other than dog tags. Some of us really can’t handle the clanking together of those things! Sewing your phone number onto a collar is a simple way to let other humans know how to find you if your pup gets lost. Using a bright contrasting color will also help people see your number without getting too close to your dog. This is super important if you have a skittish pup who may run when strangers get too close.

    We all know that accidents happen. Even the most vigilant parent can lose their pup. These prevention tips will help you reunite with your BFF if the worst happens. And remember, the faster you find your pup, the safer he’ll be. Here at Petland, we make sure that ALL of our puppies are properly microchipped and registered for identification. We also offer a wide variety of pet tags, as well as collars, leashes and harnesses!

     

  • Why Dogs Are Still at Risk for Sunburn, Even Though They Have Fur?

    Ah summer, the wonderful season filled with beach days, weekends at the cottage, and picnics in the park. Unfortunately, if you’re not careful it’s also the season, of blotchy, red, irritating sunburn. We know that sunburns are a serious summertime issue for humans, but what about dogs?

    As it turns out, despite their fur coats dogs can suffer from sunburns just like humans. While some pups are more susceptible to burns than others, all dogs have vulnerable areas on their bodies.

    Unsurprisingly, hairless breeds such as the Chinese Crested and the Xoloitzcuintli are at the greatest risk for sunburn. With limited or no fur to act a barrier of protection against the sun, they can suffer the same burns people do when they go outside without sun protection.

    Having fur doesn’t guarantee sun protection, however. You know how a white t-shirt only provides SPF coverage of about 7? The same goes for white fur.

    Dogs with white fur have very fair skin under it that is susceptible to burns from UV rays.

    What about dogs with thick, dark coats? Even dogs that fall in this category have parts of their body that are at risk for sunburns. Areas where their fur is thinner, such as the stomach or ears, or even their nose or pads of their feet can become burnt with prolonged sun exposure.

    If dogs can suffer from sunburns just like humans, what we can do to protect them from the sun? The best thing you can do to keep your pooch from getting sunburn is to keep them out of direct sunlight. If you’re going to outside for an extended length of time, bringing an umbrella for shade or setting up under a big tree is a good idea.

    If you’re going to in an area without shade, it might be a good idea to pick up some dog-friendly sunscreen. There are a few different sunscreen brands available on the market, but talk to your veterinarian about which would be best for your pup. When applying the sunscreen, make sure you get the areas that are most susceptible to burns, such as ears, nose, belly, and anywhere else where fur is light.

    If your dog does get sunburn, you can use the same treatments as you do on yourself, such as taking an oatmeal bath and applying cooling aloe vera gel. Just remember to keep an eye on your pup to ensure they don’t lick off the product. If your dog does not seem to be feeling or looking better in a few days, contact your veterinarian.

    Just because dogs can get sunburn doesn’t mean that they will. Taking the steps to protect your pup from the sun will ensure that there’s nothing stopping you from enjoying your summer adventures to the fullest!

     

  • Are You and Your Pooch Good Neighbors? Check Out These 5 Tips for Making Sure!

    Sure, you and your dog are perfect housemates. You give Fido food, and the pooch gives you snuggles. Sounds like it all works out. But are you and your pup good neighbors? If you’re not sure if the folks on your block would say yes, then check out this list and see if you do these things.

    1. “No poop left behind” should be your mantra.
    Never ever leave your dog poop just lying around, like little smelly minefields waiting to find shoe victims. Not only is it bad for the environment, but not cleaning up after your dog is just a crappy thing to do and sure to get you on your neighbor’s naughty list.

    2. Teach your pooch some manners!
    You’re bound to pass some people on your walk who love your dog and want to say hi. But not everyone does (though we don’t understand why). Teach your dog not to bark, growl, jump on, or hump passersby. Consider an obedience school. A little training goes a long way.

    3. Stay in bounds.
    For the love of dog, don’t let your canine roam the neighborhood. Also, if you use a retractable leash, don’t let your dog get too far from you. It will be harder to properly supervise if Fido isn’t nearby.

    4. Keep the peace.
    There could be a lot of reasons why your dog barks all day, but none of them are going to please your neighborhood when they have to listen to it. Assess the situation and act accordingly. If you have a high-energy dog, you might need to take longer walks or hire someone to walk the dog walk you’re away. If your pooch has separation anxiety, talk to your vet and trainer about the best way to handle the situation. Consider a doggy daycare.

    5. Introduce yourself and your pooch.
    When you make an introduction, you’ll be able to find out how your neighbor feels about dogs and if they have any concerns. And should your dog ever escape, you’ll have another set of eyes in the neighborhood. Assure your neighbor they can come to you at any time with concerns.

    Don’t forget that Petland works with the best dog training companies around! If your pooch needs a little extra (or a lot extra!) training to keep you in your neighbors good graces, never hesitate to stop by and let us give you tips or refer a trainer. We also carry a ton of training treats or toys to keep your pet occupied while you’re away, we’ve got what you need! Good luck, and may your neighbors give your pooch lots of belly rubs!

  • Summer Bathing, Are You Doing It Right?

    For most of us, taking a shower or bath is usually a calming experience. For our pets, however, bathing may be anything but relaxing. Between the water, the noise, the confinement, the scrubbing and the suds, it’s no wonder why your cat or dog may sprint in the other direction of the tub. Unfortunately, grooming our pets is a necessary evil. It minimizes shedding, keeps your pet’s coat healthy, reduces allergies, decreases chances of infection and diminishes the spread of dirt and germs throughout your home. While your dog or cat may never willingly jump under the faucet, you can make bath time as positive, easy and fast an experience as possible by avoiding these common mistakes:

    Wrong Water Temperature
    Shoot for lukewarm water, says Jocelyn Robles, a professional groomer at Holiday House Pet Resort, a veterinarian-owned pet resort and training center in Doylestown, Pa. Water that’s too hot or too cold will create a negative stimulus for your pet, which may turn them off of bath time for the long haul. So how do you know it’s the right temperature? Spray the nozzle on your forearm first, just like you would if you were giving a baby a bath, Robles says. The area of skin is more sensitive to temperature than your hands.

    Harsh Spray
    The easiest way to bathe your cat or dog is with a handheld shower head or faucet nozzle in a tub or sink (if you have one, there’s no need to fill the tub or sink with water when you bathe your pet), but the sound of the loud running water combined with the water pressure may frighten and upset your pet. Instead of spraying the water jet straight on to his fur, try to keep your pet calm by letting the water hit the back of your hand first as you move the nozzle across your pet’s body, Robles says. Your dog or cat will feel your comforting touch as opposed to the pounding of the water. Once he is at ease, you can move your hand away—just make sure you get his entire coat wet.

    Wrong Shampoo Selection
    Don’t automatically grab your own shampoo—even if it’s an “all-natural” solution or a mild baby shampoo, Robles says. “A pet’s skin has a different pH balance than humans,” she added. “Your shampoo will be drying to them.” Your veterinarian can help you with product recommendations, but you’ll generally want to look for brands that are specifically formulated for cats or dogs and follow the directions for shampooing on the label. Oatmeal-based shampoos are a gentle option. Medicated shampoos are an essential part of treating many skin conditions. Ask your veterinarian which might be right for your dog or cat. If your pet has sensitive skin, test the shampoo on a patch on the back of his leg first, and then look for any signs of irritation a couple days before a bath.

    Poor Soap Application
    You may want to apply soap to your pet’s fur and then let it “soak in” for a couple minutes, but you won’t remove all the dirt and oil that way, Robles says. You need to agitate the shampoo to trap the grime and wash it away. Actively massage the soap into your dog or cat’s fur with your hands and fingers for four minutes. Start with your pet’s legs and work your way up to his face (the most sensitive area), Robles says. Clean his face with a cotton ball or washcloth and be careful to avoid his eyes. Wash the outside of his ears with a tiny bit of shampoo on your fingers, a washcloth or a cotton ball. Tilt your pet’s head down before rinsing (for instance, if you’re washing his left ear, angle the left side of his head down) to keep water from going into the ear canal and to prevent ear infections, Robles says. Pay extra attention to your pet’s paw pads, too, as these areas can sweat and trap odor. Then rinse away the shampoo with the shower nozzle, reversing the order in which you shampooed. Start with your pet’s head this time and then work your way down to his legs. That way, if any soap got in your pet’s eyes, they’ll be rinsed first. Make sure the water runs clear of suds before you finish.

    Bad Brushing Technique
    You should brush your dog or cat before and after a bath, but only if you regularly brush him at least three times a week, Robles says. Brushing can be painful and uncomfortable if there are matts or knots in your pet’s fur. “This can turn grooming into a negative,” she says. “You can’t just brush them out.” If your dog or cat has tangled fur, take him to a professional groomer first, then start a regular brushing routine. This will not only keep your pet’s coat shinier and tangle-free, but also keep him cleaner between baths. For breeds with double coats that shed (such as Labrador Retrievers and German Shepherds), you can brush your pet while he is shampooed to help remove some of the excess undercoat, but for all other breeds, make sure your pet is as dry as possible after the bath and before brushing, Robles said. If his fur is too saturated with water, you’ll only create mats. You can even wait until the next day to brush. A slicker brush and/or long-tooth comb will work best for most breeds. Some de-shedding tools and undercoat rakes have been known to knick the skin and cause infections, so double check all tools with a professional groomer or veterinarian you trust before using them, Robles says. A groomer will also be able to demonstrate the proper way to brush your pet from head to paw.

    Hasty Drying Technique
    Make sure you have towels ready to go before the bath (the last thing you want is a soaking wet pet sprinting through your home!) and, if you own a dog, have a few towels on the floor and one ready to drape over his back in case he wants to shake off during the bath. After a bath most pet owners quickly towel down their pet, but you should try to get the fur as dry as possible, Robles says. Use a towel to gently squeeze the fur and pull out as much water as possible, she said. By the end, your pet should be damp but not dripping wet. You’ll want to leave using a blow dryer or any other type of drying tool to the professional groomer, Robles says. It’s difficult to regulate the temperature of the airflow, which increases the risk of burning your pet’s skin. Plus, most animals are scared of the noise, which may put a damper on the end of an otherwise positive bath time experience.

    Bathing Too Often
    Dogs and cats naturally groom themselves, so you probably don’t need to bathe your pet more than once a month, Robles says. Too many baths can actually strip away the natural oils in your pet’s coat and cause skin irritation. Speak with your veterinarian to determine the best grooming schedule and best type of shampoo for your pet’s breed and activity level.

    Here at Petland, we have a wide variety of shampoos, conditioners, spritzes and grooming tools to help you help your pet happy and healthy this summer! Stop by today!

  • What to do When Your Dog Just. Won’t. Go.

    We’ve all had those mornings. You know the ones – the alarm didn’t go off, your hot water took forever to heat up, you couldn’t find those pants you wanted to wear today and all of a sudden you’re soooo late and all you need is for your dog to stop sniffing around outside and go to the bathroom! Yeah, like I said, we’ve all had one of those. Well, hopefully the tips below will help your pooch get down to business when you need him to. But there’s nothing you can do about the dreaded “nothing goes your way” days!

    1. Make sure your pup’s reluctance to go potty is not a sign of a medical condition. Dogs are smart. They often figure out that once they poop, the walk’s over. But before you accuse your pup of being a manipulative little genius, find out if they’re holding it in because of something more serious. Urinary tract infections are a common cause of urinary retention, and constipation might be stopping up your dog’s bowels. Get the opinion of a trusted vet before you trying any of the methods below.

    2. Find a quiet area and make it a habitual potty spot. Like us, pups prefer to go #1 and #2 in peace. Your dog might be uneasy relieving himself in an area with lots going on. It’s kind of like when you go to the bathroom and someone talks to you through the door and suddenly find yourself with a weird case of bathroom stage fright.

    3. Tummy massage. Never underestimate the power of a gentle tummy rub. Your pup will think he’s just getting a normal belly rub for being a good pup, but soft clockwise motions might help get things moving, if you know what I mean.

    4. Use a command. Most people use “Go poop,” but feel free to get creative. I have also heard of people who say, “Do your business” and “Go potty.” The important thing is that your pup knows it’s go time when you say the magic words so you’re not walking up and down the same street for an entire hour because your pooch thinks you’re just going for a normal walk.

    5. Get that cute booty moving! When housetraining, owners are advised to take their pup outside or to a fresh puppy pad immediately after playtime, because all that horsing around encourages your pup to let loose! Taking a quick jog around the neighborhood or playing a game of fetch might be just what your dog needs to finally go.

    We hope that these tips will be effective the next your pup needs to hurry things along because you need to get out the door! Let us know any tips or tricks that you might have for “potty time” with your puppy, we are always looking for good advice to pass along! Thanks for being a loyal reader of our blogs!

  • Where to Shop: 27 Stores That Are Pet Friendly

    As summer is fully upon us and the opportunity to leave your pooch in the car for a quick errand is past, these stores have fully jumped on the pet bandwagon and will allow you to bring your pet in for that quick shopping experience. And while most pet stores (including ours) and pet supply stores (also including ours) are a no-brainer for being able to bring your pet in, some of these other places you might not have guessed are pet friendly! Please enjoy, and hopefully frequent, the following list:

    Abercrombie & Fitch
    Michael’s
    Hobby Lobby
    Ross
    Sephora
    Ann Taylor/Ann Taylor Loft
    Tiffany & Co.
    Bath & Body Works
    Hallmark
    Home Depot
    Pottery Barn
    Macy’s
    Bass Pro Shops
    Barnes & Noble
    LUSH Cosmetics (their products are also famously not tested on animals, I highly recommend them!)
    Gap
    Bloomingdale’s
    Urban Outfitters
    Anthropologie
    Free People
    Foot Locker
    Bebe
    Nordstroms
    Old Navy
    Sacks Fifth Avenue
    Tractor Supply Co.
    The Apple Store

    We thoroughly hope this list helps out next time you have your pup in tow and need to make a stop, or even if you want to work on how your pet behaves in an outside environment for training purposes. As I said above, our Petland Kennesaw store welcomes pets of all shapes and sizes, fur or feathers! As always, thank you for reading our blog!

  • 5 Frozen Homemade Dog Treats for Your Cool Pup!

    With summer being upon us and the temperatures continuing to rise, we need to be extra diligent in making sure our pups stay cool and hydrated! Earlier this week, we had a blog about tricks and tips for keeping your dog cool and one of those tricks was using frozen treats. Now for those feeling extra adventurous, skip the store bought frozen treats and make your own with these seven recipes, I guarantee you, your pup will be overjoyed!

    1. Peanut Butter & Apple Pupsicles:
    Ingredients:
    2 containers (6 oz. each) plain yogurt
    2 tablespoons honey
    2 tablespoons peanut butter
    1/3 cup regular applesauce (or a 4 oz. snack size portion)

    Instructions:
    Stir together all ingredients in a mixing bowl with a spoon until well combined. Divide mixture into small paper or plastic cups (or ice cube trays for bite-sized treats) and freeze for about 3-4 hours. Loosen treat by holding cup under warm water from the faucet and serve.

    Via: http://zimonawhim.com/2012/04/20/homemade-frozen-dog-treats-pupsicles/

    2. Frozen Yogurt & Berry Bones:
    Ingredients
    1/2 cup whole Blueberries
    1 cup chopped Strawberries
    1 cup plain Yogurt

    Directions
    1. Combine all ingredients until mixed.
    2. Pour into molds (we used bone shaped, but any will do!) and freeze for at least 4 to 5 hours before serving.

    Via: http://doggydessertchef.com/2013/09/02/strawberry-blueberry-yogurt/

    3. Frozen Star Shaped Treats:
    Ingredients:
    1 cup water
    8 strawberries
    1/4 cup blueberries

    Instructions:
    Rinse fruit and cut stems off the strawberries. Mix 1/2 cup water along with all the strawberries in a blender until liquefied. Repeat with the blueberries. Pour mixture into star shaped ice cube trays (you can always use regular ice cube trays, but the ones with shapes are so cute!) Let freeze 2-4 hours at least.

    Via: http://irresistiblepets.net/2012/08/diy-frozen-star-dog-treats/

    4. PB&J Pops:
    Ingredients
    1/4 cup Peanut Butter
    2 cups Strawberries, chopped (frozen or fresh)
    1/2 cup Blueberries (frozen or fresh)
    1 3/4 cup plain Yogurt, divided
    4 Rawhide Sticks

    First Layer
    1/4 cup Peanut Butter
    3/4 cup plain Yogurt
    Add peanut butter and yogurt to a blender or food processor and blend until smooth

    Second Layer
    2 cups Strawberries, chopped
    1/4 cup plain Yogurt
    Add strawberries and yogurt to a blender or food processor and blend until smooth

    Third Layer
    1/2 cup Blueberries
    3/4 cup plain Yogurt
    Mix blueberries and yogurt

    Directions
    1. Pour an inch or so of your first layer mixture into the bottom of each cup.
    2. Allow to freeze for 30 minutes, and insert your rawhide stick.
    3. Repeat pouring the layers, allowing them to set 30 minutes in between, until they are all used.
    4. Freeze for 8 hours to allow them to fully set.
    5. Run warm water around the mold to remove the popsicle.
    Makes 4 popsicles.

    Via: http://doggydessertchef.com/2012/05/28/pbj-pops/

    5. Frozen Peanut Butter & Yogurt Heart Treats:
    Ingredients:
    Plain organic Greek yogurt
    Natural peanut butter
    Heart shaped ice cube tray

    Directions:
    Spoon a small amount of peanut butter into the base of the ice tray. You can heat up the peanut butter first to make it easier (and not so messy) to spoon in. The more you add, the thicker the top layer on the treats will appear. Next up, dollop heaping spoonfuls of the yogurt to cover the peanut butter in each mold. Press yogurt down into the molds using the back of your spoon to make sure they’re packed. This will help seal the peanut butter and yogurt together in the final treat. You can even gently “drop” the tray a few times in order to encourage further settling. If you have excess yogurt in any of the molds, gently scoop away until level with mold and pop into the freezer for at least 4 hours and then pop out of tray for a cool summer treat!

    Via: http://www.17apart.com/2014/02/valentines-pets-diy-natural-frozen-dog.html

    As with anything that your dog consumes, make sure you supervise after you give them one of these treats to make sure your pup doesn’t react badly to them. If your pup is sensitive to certain foods or is on a special diet, double check with your vet before making any treats that might not be the best thing for them. And if you end up making some and they are a hit, please let us know! Thanks so much for taking the time to read our blog, we really appreciate it!

  • 7 Ways to Keep Your Pup Cool This Summer!

    Summer is an awesome time for long walks, beach runs and enjoying the outdoors with your furry friend. But while we are pretty clued up on the sun screen and shades combo when it comes to our hooman sun safety, it’s also important that we take care of our pup’s needs when making the most of the weather. So here’s our tips for how to help your pooch beat the heat.

    1. Take fresh water on walks
    Always take a cold bottle of water along with you on walks. Keeping well hyrdrated is essential on a hot day, so fresh water should be in plentiful supply. If your dog is panting or seems sluggish, make sure to take regular breaks in a shaded space and give your pooch a drink. Avoid giving your pup too much exercise when the heat is high as overdoing it is a common cause of heatstroke.

    2. Have your dog’s fur groomed
    Just like we tend to opt for more manageable hair styles in the summer months, our pooches need a restyle too. A dog’s undercoat is part of their natural cooling system, but if not properly groomed it can become matted and prevent airflow across your dog’s skin. Remember not to have their fur completely removed, though, as the bare skin could burn in the sun.

    3. Never leave your dog in a parked car
    Leaving a pet in a car in warm weather is illegal in many states, and it’s easy to see why. The temperature rises fast and the enclosed space could lead your pooch to panic. If travelling in a car with your dog, make sure to use your air-conditioning or leave the windows open to get in as much fresh air as possible.

    4. Give cold treats
    One of our favorite ways to cool off in the sun is to snack on ice cream, and your pup doesn’t have to miss out on the fun. Chilled or frozen treats are a fun surprise for dogs and can help relieve boredom as well as conquer the heat.

    5. Avoid midday walks
    Try to stick to the coolness of morning and evening walks when the weather is hot, letting your pup spend the hottest part of the day indoors. Choose shaded routes where the pavement will be a lot more comfortable on their paws and the heat less intense. If your dog will be outside in a garden during this part of the day, be sure to provide a covered porch space or kennel for your pooch to take a break from the heat.

    6. Wet your pup’s feet
    Dogs tend to cool themselves from the bottom upwards, so wetting their feet will help control their temperature. You could invest in a cooling pad or set up a kiddie splash pool in the garden to allow your dog a little paddle on warm days.

    7. Protect your dog from sunburn
    Sunburn is especially common in fair and short-haired breeds. If your pup is a sun worshiper or is set to be out in the heat for a prolonged period, apply dog-friendly sunscreen to their nose, ears, belly, groin and inside legs. If you’re struggling to find a dog-specific sunscreen, opt for one that’s fit for human babies or sensitive skin. Make sure to check with your vet if unsure on treatment choices.

    Thank you for reading our summer fun blog! We took a little vacation last week, but the rest of this week will be filled with cool treats to help keep your pooch cool and happy this summer!

    Via: http://barkpost.com/discover/pup-cool-summer/