Posts Tagged ‘outside’

  • 10 Most Amazing Scientific Discoveries About Dogs

    Hello! Over here at Petland Kennesaw, we hope you are having a wonderful spring and we wanted to bring you some interesting facts about some of our favorite four-legged companions. And while we are still learning about the animals in our lives, here are 10 of the most interesting scientific discoveries that have been made about dogs so far:

    Number 10: They have 3 eyelids. Like people, dogs have top and bottom ones that move up and down. They also have one that originates in the corner of the eye and moves side to side. Its purpose is for clearing mucus and debris.

    Number 9: Dogs really do love their humans. There’s scientific proof of it. MRI scans revealed that when presented with the scents of various people and canines, the reward centers of the dogs’ brains were most responsive to the aromas of their human companions.

    Number 8: They’re just as smart as toddlers. Specially designed IQ tests show that dogs’ capabilities are on par with the typical 2-year-old. That means they’re capable of learning over 150 words and gestures.

    Number 7: Dog paws often smell like snack foods. There’s some debate as to whether the particular scent is popcorn or corn chips, but either way the cause of it has been linked to a bacteria dogs pick up while walking about.

    Number 6: Canines possess the super power of night vision. It’s not cat-level, but it is superior to the darkness navigating abilities of humans. Dogs’ pupils are larger and their central retinas have more cells dedicated to light sensitivity than to color detection. That gives them an upper hand when it comes to making out objects in dim light.

    Number 5: Every nose is unique. The Canadian Kennel Club has been using nose prints as a means of individual identification since the 1930s, and many organizations have followed suit.

    Number 4: They most likely dream. Proof isn’t at the 100 percent mark, but there is an abundance of support backing the claim. Much of it is based in brain attributes and behaviors that dogs and humans share. Among them are structure and the occurrence of electrical impulses during the deep sleep stage.

    Number 3: Fur isn’t just about warmth. In the summer it acts as insulation, keeping heat from reaching the body. Fur also protects the skin from the sun’s damaging rays.

    Number 2: They really do listen when you talk. Even better, they’ve been shown to understand a lot of what’s being said. Though they’re not able to decipher the words, dogs can interpret certain sounds and the message’s overall emotional tone.

    Number 1: Dogs aren’t nearly as sweaty as humans. That’s largely because rather than having sweat glands all over the bodies, as people do, dogs only have them in their paws. To cool off, they rely mostly on panting.

    We hope you have been just as blown away as we were about these incredible dog discoveries! Make sure you amaze your friends and family with all this newfound knowledge about man’s best friend! Thank you for taking the time to read our blog and we’ll see you next time!

    Via: http://www.aol.com/article/2015/07/30/10-incredible-scientific-discoveries-about-dogs/21216016/?utm_source=zergnet.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=zergnet_632919&ncid=txtlnkusaolp00001361

  • Traveling with Your Pooch this Summer? Check Out Our Travel Checklist!

    Travel Checklist for Anyone Taking Their Pooch on the Road This Summer!

    The season is upon us to go traveling with our families, and for some of us that includes our four-legged family members as well! This checklist is just a quick reminder of the essentials when leaving home with our animals, so don’t forget to check back when you’re heading out of town so you don’t forget anything you need.

    1. Leash & Collar
    This seems like an easy one, but you’d be surprised how often they accidentally get left behind when you’re loading Fido (and everything else!) into the car. These things are essential for the safety of your dog when taking bathroom breaks, as the territory is unfamiliar and may take more than a simple command to get your pooch under control.

    2. Medical & Vaccination Records
    This is often something that gets left behind in the hustle and bustle of packing for a trip, but oh so important when traveling with your dog. Should you be boarding your animal or if an emergency happens while on the road, it is important to have all the information you need you get your pet fully cared for. And if you’re leaving the country, checking what vaccinations are required is a must if you don’t want to run the risk of being denied entry!

    3. Identification Tags
    Usually this goes hand-in-hand with your leash and collar, but is worth noting just in case your tag is out of date with an incorrect address or phone number. Also, make sure your pet’s micro-chip is registered correctly and has up to date information in case your pet is lost or stolen.

    4. First Aid Travel Kit
    It seems a little far-fetched, but you never know what could happen on a long road trip, especially if it’s your dogs first time! Some things to include in this kit are eye wash, stypic powder for bleeding and antiseptic wipes. Be prepared, your pet will thank you!

    5. Blankets or Seat Protectors
    It’s no fun to have to sit in hair or mud after your pooch has been laying on your car seats either from a short trip to a long drive, so it might make things easier for you if you avoid the problem altogether by covering them ahead of time. And don’t forget an extra towel or two, just in case your pet gets into some really dirty fun on the way!

    6. Safety Restraints
    Check to see if your state has passed a mandatory seat belt law for pets, or if they haven’t ask yourself how safe your pet is without one. Do they tend to distract you by moving around constantly? Make sure both you and your animal stay safe in the car by considering a seat belt harness.

    7. Food & Water
    This also seems like another no-brainer, but it’s important for your dog to have comfort in the food they are used to and that won’t upset their stomach. And having a nice supply of bottled water for a long trip is an essential for keeping your dog hydrated.

    8. Toys, Toys and More Toys
    If your pet is a nervous traveler (and even if they aren’t!) it’s always a good idea to have plenty of their familiar toys lying around. It will make they trip better for you if you don’t have to constantly monitor your pet to make sure they don’t have their teeth on anything they shouldn’t and better for them if they have something that reminds them of home.

    9. Always Check with the Hotel
    If you’re staying in a hotel in part of or all of your trip, it’s a good idea to double check the hotel for any last minute changes to their pet policy. Sometimes hotels will go non-pet friendly or have a change in rules on how big the dog can be or even what breed, sad but true. It’s definitely worth a short phone call to find out, especially if you’ve booked way in advance!

    I hope this travel checklist will prove useful to you if you’re going to be travelling with your animals this summer! As always, thank you for being a loyal customer and blog reader!

  • 8 Tips for Dog Proofing Your Backyard

    It seems like common knowledge that you have to “dog-proof” or “puppy-proof” your home when you bring a new animal into your space, but we don’t always remember the outside spaces! Here is a simple checklist of things to watch out for in your backyard, especially with the summer almost upon us. This post is primarily for dogs, but works just as well for other new pets like cats and various small animals.

    1. Choose Dog-Safe Flowers for Garden
    Seasonal flowerbeds are beautiful, but many common flowers, including tulips, daffodils, azaleas and amaryllis can be poisonous to dogs. Talk to your vet about which plants are safe for dogs before you put on your gardening gloves or allow your pet outside unsupervised!

    2. Secure Trash Cans/Garage Supplies
    Trash cans and recycling bins should be secured with appropriate lids. Liquids such as fuel, cleaning supplies and antifreeze (which can be fatal to pets), needs to be stored out of reach of your pet. Bug or rat bait and herbicides should be used with caution and stored properly, as they can also be fatal to dogs.

    3. Fence Around Swimming Pools
    Even if your dog is a strong swimmer, he or she should never be left unattended in a yard with a pool. Your pool area should be fenced, and your dog should know how to safely enter and exit the pool from an early age.

    4. Check Fence for ‘Weak’ Spots
    Even if your yard has a fence, a wiggly pup can easily slip through tiny gaps or holes you may not notice. Regularly check the fence in your yard to make sure it is secure before letting your dog out in the yard.

    5. Mow Lawn/Landscape Regularly
    Ticks will use tall grasses and branches in your yard to hitch a ride onto your dog’s skin. To help keep ticks at bay trim back high, tall grasses and remove debris. And always, always, always use flea and tick prevention on your pets!

    6. Routinely Clean Decks, Sheds and Other Backyard Structures
    Fleas tend to live in dark, humid areas like outdoor dog homes, decks and outdoor structures such as sheds. Sweep off patios, clean under your deck and remove debris from outdoor structures to prevent fleas from congregating in your yard.

    7. Keep Dogs Away from Lawns that Have Been Recently Treated with Insecticide, Pesticide or Fertilizer
    Insecticides can help curb bug problems, but when applied heavily, may be toxic to pets. Try to avoid using insecticide when possible or talk to your veterinarian about the best way to use such chemicals. Keep your pet off lawns that have recently been treated with insecticides, pesticides or fertilizers.

    8. Provide Water and Shade
    Dogs love playing outdoors year-round, but dehydration and heat sickness can be a very real threat in warm, sunny weather. Make sure to give your pup plenty of breaks in the shade, access to fresh water and the ability to go inside if he needs it.

    These are just a couple of quick to-dos before bringing in or keeping pets outside. Another thing to keep in mind is always having a collar with easily identified tags with your information as well as having your pet micro-chipped and registered with a national pet database. This is so important that every puppy and kitten that leaves our store is micro-chipped for lifetime identification and registered with their new owners before they even leave the store! If you have any other questions about “puppy-proofing” either your house or yard, please don’t hesitate to ask our very helpful Pet Counselors and they should be able to help point you in the right direction. And thank you for reading our blog posts! Until next time, have a safe and happy start to your summer!