Posts Tagged ‘kitten’

  • Don’t Forget About the Kitties, Homemade Treats for Your Beloved Feline Friends!

    I know we’ve done several blogs about homemade treats for dogs, one that was pumpkin spice inspired just last week, in fact! But I don’t want to leave out other beloved pets that would love, love, love some homemade treats! This week will be a couple of great treats that you can make for all the cat lovers out there, so take a look! Make sure you check the ingredients with your vet to make sure everything is okay to give to your four-legged friend.

    Catnip Cat Treats:

    Ingredients:

    5 oz tuna in water, drained

    1 egg

    ½ cup flour

    ¼ cup wheat germ

    ½ cup cornmeal

    ¼ cup wheat flour

    ¼ cup water

    ½ tablespoon catnip

    Instructions:

    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees
    2. Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper
    3. Mix all ingredients in a large bowl until combined
    4. Form into a dough, it will by sticky!
    5. Place dough onto a floured surface
    6. Pull off small pieces of dough and roll into small balls
    7. Push the dough down so the treat is the size of a nickel and place on parchment paper
    8. Bake at 350 for 20 minutes, allow to cool completely and serve!

    Via: http://www.messforless.net/catnip-cat-treats-recipe/

    Homemade Organic Spinach and Chicken Cat Treats:

    Ingredients:

    1/2 pound steamed organic boneless and skinless chicken thighs (You can sub with salmon or tuna!)

    1 cup fresh organic spinach leaves

    1 cup organic quick-cooking oats

    1 organic brown egg

    1 tablespoon organic catnip

    1/4 cup flour

    Directions:

    1. Preheat your oven to 350ºF. Steam the boneless and skinless chicken thighs until cooked through. You can swap for boneless and skinless organic chicken breasts, salmon, or tuna with cat-loving results too. Let the chicken cool for 20 minutes before the next step.
    2. Place the chicken, oats, spinach leaves, egg, and catnip in a blender or food processor, and pulse on low until the mixture blends together. It should still be a bit chunky but also smooth, similar to the texture of wet sand.
    3. Pop the mixture into a bowl and add the flour. You can also add a dash of salt or sugar to mix up the flavor. Use your hands to knead the dough until it’s no longer sticky, then place on a flour-dusted work surface.
    4. Use a rolling pin to create a rectangle of dough around 1/2 inch thick. With the help of a pizza cutter or small cookie cutter, create small shapes for the finished treats.
    5. Place the kitty treats on a parchment-lined sheet tray, and bake for 20 minutes. Remove from the oven, cool until room temperature, and then toss to your cat.

    Via: http://www.popsugar.com/pets/Homemade-Organic-Cat-Treats-30776974

    3 Ingredient Salmon Cat Treats:

    Ingredients:

    10 oz canned salmon (undrained)

    1 egg (beaten)

    2 cups whole wheat flour

    Instructions:

    1. Heat oven to 350°. Pulse 10 oz canned salmon (undrained) in a food processor and chop as finely as possible.
    2. In a stand mixer, combine salmon, 1 egg (beaten) and 2 cups whole wheat flour until dough forms. If dough is too dry, add up to 1/3 cup water. If dough is too wet or sticky, add a bit more flour. Dough should be tacky but not sticky.
    3. Roll out dough on a floured surface until about 1/4 inch thick. Use a 3/4-inch cookie cutter in the shape of your choice to create your treats.
    4. Place treats on a parchment-lined baking sheet and bake at 350° for about 20 minutes. When they’re slightly browned and crunchy, they’re done.
    5. Allow to cool before serving.
    6. Store in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks.

    Via: http://www.thecookierookie.com/3-ingredient-salmon-cat-treats/

     

    Goat’s Milk Cat-Sicles:

    Ingredients:

    Instant goat’s milk

    Water

    Silicone tray

    Directions:

    1. Mix goat’s milk packet with water as directed
    2. Pour evenly into the silicone ice tray
    3. Put in the freezer for at least an hour
    4. Serve to happy kitties!
    5. You can leave in freezer for up to a week
    6. As an extra additive, throw one of your cat’s favorite treats into each cat-sicle as a little surprise!

    Via: http://www.catster.com/cat-food/

  • How to Teach Your Kitten to Use a Litter Box

    Training a kitten to use a litterbox is typically easier than training a puppy to go potty outside. Most kittens who are at least 8 weeks old will already know how to use the litterbox, but some kittens, especially younger ones, may still require some help from you. Here’s how to train a kitten to do his business in the litterbox.

    Introducing the Litterbox
    You can encourage your kitten to use the litterbox by placing him in it at regular intervals, especially if he’s recently eaten or awakened. Place him in the box and wait to see what happens. Most kittens will naturally start to dig in sand or litter by about 4 weeks of age — if you see your kitten doing this, don’t interfere. If he doesn’t do anything, try gently taking his front paws and scratching the litter with them. When you let go, he may continue doing it on his own and then feel compelled to go ahead and eliminate. Most cats prefer some privacy when they eliminate. So if you hover over him or try to help, you may convince him to go elsewhere. Instead, give him some space, then praise him and offer a treat when he’s finished. If you find your kitten eliminating outside of the litterbox, quickly pick him up and deposit him in the box. Don’t yell or be rough, which will just frighten him and possibly cause him to associate the litterbox with punishment. Cleanse soiled areas with an enzyme-based cleaner. It’s helpful if you place the waste in the box, so your kitten can follow the scent to find the litterbox.

    Choosing the Right Box and Litter
    Start by making sure you have the right number of litterboxes: You should have at least one per cat, plus one extra. If you have more than one cat, place the boxes well away from each other, as some cats can be territorial about boxes. You can use a smaller box for a kitten than for an adult — in fact, be sure the kitten can get over the sides without having to jump. The box should be made of nonabsorbent material (no cardboard, unless it’s just for a day). Many people prefer litterboxes with tops, as they look better and contain odors better. However, some cats don’t like using covered boxes. When first starting, you’ll probably have better luck with a topless litterbox.
    Place the box in a quiet location away from your kitten’s eating and sleeping areas and separate from high-traffic areas, but close enough so the kitten doesn’t have to go far to find it. Make sure that closed doors can’t block the kitten from accessing it. A corner location is best, because it allows your cat to keep a watchful eye on his surroundings when he’s in the vulnerable act of eliminating. Once you’ve found a place for the litterbox, leave it there. Don’t constantly move it around.
    There are many types of litters to choose from, including clumping, nonclumping and crystals. You might want to experiment a bit to see which type your kitten prefers. The depth of the litter may vary, again, by your kitten’s preferences. But adding more litter is not an alternative to cleaning the box.
    Scoop out any solid wastes at least once a day and change the litter entirely at least once a week. Never throw litter down your drain pipes, as it can cause costly plumbing problems. Avoid using scented litter or strong-smelling cleaners, as these strong odors may repel the kitten.
    If your previously litterbox-trained cat begins to eliminate elsewhere, it may be for a number of reasons, including: You’ve changed litter type, haven’t changed the litter enough, have another cat who is keeping him out, have used a strong-smelling cleanser on the box or have made some other change relating to the litterbox. But it could also be because your cat has a medical problem. When in doubt, always consult your veterinarian.

    This blog is an extension of the one we did earlier this week, but that doesn’t make it any less important! New kittens are usually pretty good, but occasionally you’ll have one that’s a little confused and that’s okay as long as you get them on the right track of course! Never hesitate to swing by the store and pick our Pet Counselors’ brains (they won’t mind!) about tips and tricks for bringing home a new kitten. We also stock many different kinds of litter and litterboxes, as well as foods, treats and toys for your new furry family member. Thanks for reading our blog and we’ll see you in the store soon!

  • 5 Litterbox Mistakes You Could Be Making, Yikes!

    It’s come to my attention that we need more blog posts about our other favorite four legged friends – the kitty cats! While they are not quite as popular a pet as the dog, that doesn’t make them any less special to the owners that love them. Cats, however, are typically easier to take care of that their dog counterparts and require very little for their day-to-day upkeep. But that being said, there is the dreaded litterbox to contend with! Does this situation sound familiar? You head to your kitty’s litterbox to scoop it out and discover that she’s decided to go to the bathroom elsewhere. How frustrating! But don’t blame your cat just yet. She might have a medical condition that needs attention. In fact, the first thing you should do if she’s improperly eliminating is take her to the vet to rule out any medical problems. If it turns out that the issue isn’t health related, then look at other potential reasons. In fact, you might be the cause of her litterbox issues. Oh no! Here’s a list of common mistakes that happen with having a litterbox trained kitty.

    You’re not cleaning her litterbox enough.
    Many cats won’t use the litterbox if it’s not in pristine condition. We know it’s probably not your favorite chore, but you should scoop it out at least twice daily and add more litter as needed. Clean the actual box with baking soda or unscented soap once a week. To make your life a little easier, make a litterbox kit with all the essentials (litter, bags and scoop), so you have everything handy.

    It’s in a less than ideal location.
    Place your cat’s litterbox in an area that’s quiet and away from her resting areas, as well as her food and water bowls. If there’s too much foot traffic or if it’s too close to where she eats, she might opt to go to the bathroom somewhere else. Also consider how much privacy the location offers and how easy it for your cat to access it.

    You don’t have enough litterboxes.
    For many cats, having just one litterbox to use is not going to cut it. Instead follow this general rule: one litterbox per cat plus one. So if you have one cat, you’ll need two litterboxes; two cats need three litterboxes. More boxes might be necessary if your house is large or has multiple floors.

    It’s not big enough.
    When it comes to litterboxes, size matters. A 2014 study conducted by veterinarian and behaviorist Norma Guy found that cats tend to prefer big litterboxes to small ones. Ideally, the litterbox should be at least one and half times the length of the cat’s body (not including the tail). Additionally, cats are not always fans of covered litterboxes, so you should try leaving it uncovered.

    You’re not addressing your cat’s stressors.
    If your cat is missing the litterbox, it could be a sign that she has anxiety. Common stressors are when there is a move or a new baby or new pet in the household. If you have multiple cats, one of them could be bullying your kitty and preventing her from using the litterbox. The stressor could even be more subtle than that. For instance, she might be stressed that you changed to a new type of litter, moved her litterbox to a new location or that the depth of litter has changed. If you’re not sure what’s causing your kitty to miss the litterbox, talk to your veterinarian, who may refer you to a veterinary behaviorist.

    Petland Kennesaw also has a variety of different litterboxes, as well as different foods to try or calming supplements if anxiety is stressing your beloved feline out. Or if we don’t have what you need, ask one of our Pet Counselors if we can special order it for you. We can also be very knowledgeable about cat food and how different brands can affect your cat’s delicate system. That’s all for now, thanks for staying up to date on our blog!