Posts Tagged ‘facts’

  • Why Dogs Are Still at Risk for Sunburn, Even Though They Have Fur?

    Ah summer, the wonderful season filled with beach days, weekends at the cottage, and picnics in the park. Unfortunately, if you’re not careful it’s also the season, of blotchy, red, irritating sunburn. We know that sunburns are a serious summertime issue for humans, but what about dogs?

    As it turns out, despite their fur coats dogs can suffer from sunburns just like humans. While some pups are more susceptible to burns than others, all dogs have vulnerable areas on their bodies.

    Unsurprisingly, hairless breeds such as the Chinese Crested and the Xoloitzcuintli are at the greatest risk for sunburn. With limited or no fur to act a barrier of protection against the sun, they can suffer the same burns people do when they go outside without sun protection.

    Having fur doesn’t guarantee sun protection, however. You know how a white t-shirt only provides SPF coverage of about 7? The same goes for white fur.

    Dogs with white fur have very fair skin under it that is susceptible to burns from UV rays.

    What about dogs with thick, dark coats? Even dogs that fall in this category have parts of their body that are at risk for sunburns. Areas where their fur is thinner, such as the stomach or ears, or even their nose or pads of their feet can become burnt with prolonged sun exposure.

    If dogs can suffer from sunburns just like humans, what we can do to protect them from the sun? The best thing you can do to keep your pooch from getting sunburn is to keep them out of direct sunlight. If you’re going to outside for an extended length of time, bringing an umbrella for shade or setting up under a big tree is a good idea.

    If you’re going to in an area without shade, it might be a good idea to pick up some dog-friendly sunscreen. There are a few different sunscreen brands available on the market, but talk to your veterinarian about which would be best for your pup. When applying the sunscreen, make sure you get the areas that are most susceptible to burns, such as ears, nose, belly, and anywhere else where fur is light.

    If your dog does get sunburn, you can use the same treatments as you do on yourself, such as taking an oatmeal bath and applying cooling aloe vera gel. Just remember to keep an eye on your pup to ensure they don’t lick off the product. If your dog does not seem to be feeling or looking better in a few days, contact your veterinarian.

    Just because dogs can get sunburn doesn’t mean that they will. Taking the steps to protect your pup from the sun will ensure that there’s nothing stopping you from enjoying your summer adventures to the fullest!

     

  • 5 Reasons Why Your Dog Loves to Destroy Their Toys!

    We’ve all seen the “dog shaming” photos on social media, showcasing the destruction caused by our loving canines who tore apart their precious toys. Do you ever leave your house only to come back later to a disaster, with your dog sitting idly by as if nothing happened? How about giving your dog toys, and they tear them apart in seconds?

    It’s no secret that dogs love their toys, but even so they manage to destroy them. But the behavior is perfectly natural, since your dogs don’t really see toys as toys. For your pup, a brand new, perfectly intact toy is nothing other than a vessel for their primal instincts!

    So here are 5 reasons your K9 counterparts love to destroy their toys:

    1. Boredom: For one, boredom! Dogs get bored, and when they do, they need to entertain themselves, and sometimes, it’s not in a way that you’ll appreciate.

    2. We Trained Them To: Another reason is we taught them to destroy things. When you get a puppy, the way they aggressively go after their toys is adorable to us, so without knowing it, we tend to encourage it, and this leads to them to continue on the path to destruction.

    3. They Get The Toy Whenever They Want: A dog that can get at his toys all of the time will eventually tear them apart. I mean, what do you really expect? It should instead be a reward rather than something enjoyable that they just get to have because they’re the best and we love them.

    4. Lack of Mental and Physical Stimulation: Similar to boredom, if play time isn’t interactive enough or doesn’t burn enough energy. You need to have toys for your dog that make them use their mind, they like to think, and they suffer when you don’t stimulate their brain. Similar to this, if you’re not exercising them, they’re going to find something to get rid of that extra energy.

    5. You Have A Heavy Chewer: Don’t be fooled by your dog’s size, even if they’re little, they can still chew with the best of them. A Chihuahua isn’t necessarily going to be happy with a plush, he might need a hard strong toy too! Get toys that work with your dog’s personality, and give them toys that work with their chew style.

    No matter what causes you dog to chew so aggressively, here at Petland we have all the replacement toys you can possibly imagine! Whether your dog prefers plush or rubber or rope we have what you need to occupy your pooch so they don’t start looking for the next best thing to their toys, which might include a very expensive shoe or piece of furniture. It is also a good idea to have plenty of toys in rotation, so they’re not so available to your dog and seem new when you hand them over. Sop by the store today and we can help you find the perfect toy (or toys!) for your pet today!

     

  • 7 Undeniable Reasons Dogs Are A Healthy Part Of A Child’s Development

    We’ve all heard the old (but completely accurate) saying “dog’s are a mans best friend”, but does this ring true for kids as well? While there are tons of proven physical and mental health benefits to owning a pup as an adult, how do our 4 legged friends affect mini adults?

    Here are 7 reasons science says dogs are good for kids.

    1. Better Breathing: Kids who grow up in houses are with dogs are healthier, and are less likely to develop allergies and other breathing related health issues, like asthma.

    2. More Active: How can you spend hours watching tv when those big puppy eyes are begging you to come outside to play a game of fetch? Kids who have a dog best friend are way more active.

    3. Nurturing Skills: Dogs can teach kids how to be better hoomans! Being kind and nurturing doesn’t always come naturally. The act of caring for a pooch allows kids to learn to care for others.

    4. Family Bonding: Dogs help bring parents and children closer together by allowing them to participate in activities that center around their pet, like a family walk.

    5. Stress Relief: Dogs are comforting for kids. Cuddling with your pup releases oxytocin (a feel good hormone) in the brain, which lowers anxiety and worry.

    6. Responsibility: Having a dog can help kids learn responsibility, making sure the family pup has food, water, and walks can give them their first experience with accountability. While it’s not a good idea to depend on your little one to meet all of your pooches needs, they can definitely share in some of the duties of pet owning.

    7. Advanced Knowledge: Owning a dog can help kids better understand Biology. Kids who are raised with pups have an easier time transferring biological information from one species to another, so by explaining to them Spot has a heart, it will be easier for them to understand that they have a heart as well.

    Pup owning is clearly the way to go when you want to raise a responsible, caring, and intelligent child. Here at Petland we specialize in helping each family find the right pet for them no matter what their lifestyle is like. We want you to feel safe and informed when doing the seemly monumental task of added a new furry family member to your household! Check out some of our past blog posts for most popular breeds of puppy for families and the most popular dog names of 2015!

     

  • Are You and Your Pooch Good Neighbors? Check Out These 5 Tips for Making Sure!

    Sure, you and your dog are perfect housemates. You give Fido food, and the pooch gives you snuggles. Sounds like it all works out. But are you and your pup good neighbors? If you’re not sure if the folks on your block would say yes, then check out this list and see if you do these things.

    1. “No poop left behind” should be your mantra.
    Never ever leave your dog poop just lying around, like little smelly minefields waiting to find shoe victims. Not only is it bad for the environment, but not cleaning up after your dog is just a crappy thing to do and sure to get you on your neighbor’s naughty list.

    2. Teach your pooch some manners!
    You’re bound to pass some people on your walk who love your dog and want to say hi. But not everyone does (though we don’t understand why). Teach your dog not to bark, growl, jump on, or hump passersby. Consider an obedience school. A little training goes a long way.

    3. Stay in bounds.
    For the love of dog, don’t let your canine roam the neighborhood. Also, if you use a retractable leash, don’t let your dog get too far from you. It will be harder to properly supervise if Fido isn’t nearby.

    4. Keep the peace.
    There could be a lot of reasons why your dog barks all day, but none of them are going to please your neighborhood when they have to listen to it. Assess the situation and act accordingly. If you have a high-energy dog, you might need to take longer walks or hire someone to walk the dog walk you’re away. If your pooch has separation anxiety, talk to your vet and trainer about the best way to handle the situation. Consider a doggy daycare.

    5. Introduce yourself and your pooch.
    When you make an introduction, you’ll be able to find out how your neighbor feels about dogs and if they have any concerns. And should your dog ever escape, you’ll have another set of eyes in the neighborhood. Assure your neighbor they can come to you at any time with concerns.

    Don’t forget that Petland works with the best dog training companies around! If your pooch needs a little extra (or a lot extra!) training to keep you in your neighbors good graces, never hesitate to stop by and let us give you tips or refer a trainer. We also carry a ton of training treats or toys to keep your pet occupied while you’re away, we’ve got what you need! Good luck, and may your neighbors give your pooch lots of belly rubs!

  • Summer Bathing, Are You Doing It Right?

    For most of us, taking a shower or bath is usually a calming experience. For our pets, however, bathing may be anything but relaxing. Between the water, the noise, the confinement, the scrubbing and the suds, it’s no wonder why your cat or dog may sprint in the other direction of the tub. Unfortunately, grooming our pets is a necessary evil. It minimizes shedding, keeps your pet’s coat healthy, reduces allergies, decreases chances of infection and diminishes the spread of dirt and germs throughout your home. While your dog or cat may never willingly jump under the faucet, you can make bath time as positive, easy and fast an experience as possible by avoiding these common mistakes:

    Wrong Water Temperature
    Shoot for lukewarm water, says Jocelyn Robles, a professional groomer at Holiday House Pet Resort, a veterinarian-owned pet resort and training center in Doylestown, Pa. Water that’s too hot or too cold will create a negative stimulus for your pet, which may turn them off of bath time for the long haul. So how do you know it’s the right temperature? Spray the nozzle on your forearm first, just like you would if you were giving a baby a bath, Robles says. The area of skin is more sensitive to temperature than your hands.

    Harsh Spray
    The easiest way to bathe your cat or dog is with a handheld shower head or faucet nozzle in a tub or sink (if you have one, there’s no need to fill the tub or sink with water when you bathe your pet), but the sound of the loud running water combined with the water pressure may frighten and upset your pet. Instead of spraying the water jet straight on to his fur, try to keep your pet calm by letting the water hit the back of your hand first as you move the nozzle across your pet’s body, Robles says. Your dog or cat will feel your comforting touch as opposed to the pounding of the water. Once he is at ease, you can move your hand away—just make sure you get his entire coat wet.

    Wrong Shampoo Selection
    Don’t automatically grab your own shampoo—even if it’s an “all-natural” solution or a mild baby shampoo, Robles says. “A pet’s skin has a different pH balance than humans,” she added. “Your shampoo will be drying to them.” Your veterinarian can help you with product recommendations, but you’ll generally want to look for brands that are specifically formulated for cats or dogs and follow the directions for shampooing on the label. Oatmeal-based shampoos are a gentle option. Medicated shampoos are an essential part of treating many skin conditions. Ask your veterinarian which might be right for your dog or cat. If your pet has sensitive skin, test the shampoo on a patch on the back of his leg first, and then look for any signs of irritation a couple days before a bath.

    Poor Soap Application
    You may want to apply soap to your pet’s fur and then let it “soak in” for a couple minutes, but you won’t remove all the dirt and oil that way, Robles says. You need to agitate the shampoo to trap the grime and wash it away. Actively massage the soap into your dog or cat’s fur with your hands and fingers for four minutes. Start with your pet’s legs and work your way up to his face (the most sensitive area), Robles says. Clean his face with a cotton ball or washcloth and be careful to avoid his eyes. Wash the outside of his ears with a tiny bit of shampoo on your fingers, a washcloth or a cotton ball. Tilt your pet’s head down before rinsing (for instance, if you’re washing his left ear, angle the left side of his head down) to keep water from going into the ear canal and to prevent ear infections, Robles says. Pay extra attention to your pet’s paw pads, too, as these areas can sweat and trap odor. Then rinse away the shampoo with the shower nozzle, reversing the order in which you shampooed. Start with your pet’s head this time and then work your way down to his legs. That way, if any soap got in your pet’s eyes, they’ll be rinsed first. Make sure the water runs clear of suds before you finish.

    Bad Brushing Technique
    You should brush your dog or cat before and after a bath, but only if you regularly brush him at least three times a week, Robles says. Brushing can be painful and uncomfortable if there are matts or knots in your pet’s fur. “This can turn grooming into a negative,” she says. “You can’t just brush them out.” If your dog or cat has tangled fur, take him to a professional groomer first, then start a regular brushing routine. This will not only keep your pet’s coat shinier and tangle-free, but also keep him cleaner between baths. For breeds with double coats that shed (such as Labrador Retrievers and German Shepherds), you can brush your pet while he is shampooed to help remove some of the excess undercoat, but for all other breeds, make sure your pet is as dry as possible after the bath and before brushing, Robles said. If his fur is too saturated with water, you’ll only create mats. You can even wait until the next day to brush. A slicker brush and/or long-tooth comb will work best for most breeds. Some de-shedding tools and undercoat rakes have been known to knick the skin and cause infections, so double check all tools with a professional groomer or veterinarian you trust before using them, Robles says. A groomer will also be able to demonstrate the proper way to brush your pet from head to paw.

    Hasty Drying Technique
    Make sure you have towels ready to go before the bath (the last thing you want is a soaking wet pet sprinting through your home!) and, if you own a dog, have a few towels on the floor and one ready to drape over his back in case he wants to shake off during the bath. After a bath most pet owners quickly towel down their pet, but you should try to get the fur as dry as possible, Robles says. Use a towel to gently squeeze the fur and pull out as much water as possible, she said. By the end, your pet should be damp but not dripping wet. You’ll want to leave using a blow dryer or any other type of drying tool to the professional groomer, Robles says. It’s difficult to regulate the temperature of the airflow, which increases the risk of burning your pet’s skin. Plus, most animals are scared of the noise, which may put a damper on the end of an otherwise positive bath time experience.

    Bathing Too Often
    Dogs and cats naturally groom themselves, so you probably don’t need to bathe your pet more than once a month, Robles says. Too many baths can actually strip away the natural oils in your pet’s coat and cause skin irritation. Speak with your veterinarian to determine the best grooming schedule and best type of shampoo for your pet’s breed and activity level.

    Here at Petland, we have a wide variety of shampoos, conditioners, spritzes and grooming tools to help you help your pet happy and healthy this summer! Stop by today!

  • How to Teach Your Kitten to Use a Litter Box

    Training a kitten to use a litterbox is typically easier than training a puppy to go potty outside. Most kittens who are at least 8 weeks old will already know how to use the litterbox, but some kittens, especially younger ones, may still require some help from you. Here’s how to train a kitten to do his business in the litterbox.

    Introducing the Litterbox
    You can encourage your kitten to use the litterbox by placing him in it at regular intervals, especially if he’s recently eaten or awakened. Place him in the box and wait to see what happens. Most kittens will naturally start to dig in sand or litter by about 4 weeks of age — if you see your kitten doing this, don’t interfere. If he doesn’t do anything, try gently taking his front paws and scratching the litter with them. When you let go, he may continue doing it on his own and then feel compelled to go ahead and eliminate. Most cats prefer some privacy when they eliminate. So if you hover over him or try to help, you may convince him to go elsewhere. Instead, give him some space, then praise him and offer a treat when he’s finished. If you find your kitten eliminating outside of the litterbox, quickly pick him up and deposit him in the box. Don’t yell or be rough, which will just frighten him and possibly cause him to associate the litterbox with punishment. Cleanse soiled areas with an enzyme-based cleaner. It’s helpful if you place the waste in the box, so your kitten can follow the scent to find the litterbox.

    Choosing the Right Box and Litter
    Start by making sure you have the right number of litterboxes: You should have at least one per cat, plus one extra. If you have more than one cat, place the boxes well away from each other, as some cats can be territorial about boxes. You can use a smaller box for a kitten than for an adult — in fact, be sure the kitten can get over the sides without having to jump. The box should be made of nonabsorbent material (no cardboard, unless it’s just for a day). Many people prefer litterboxes with tops, as they look better and contain odors better. However, some cats don’t like using covered boxes. When first starting, you’ll probably have better luck with a topless litterbox.
    Place the box in a quiet location away from your kitten’s eating and sleeping areas and separate from high-traffic areas, but close enough so the kitten doesn’t have to go far to find it. Make sure that closed doors can’t block the kitten from accessing it. A corner location is best, because it allows your cat to keep a watchful eye on his surroundings when he’s in the vulnerable act of eliminating. Once you’ve found a place for the litterbox, leave it there. Don’t constantly move it around.
    There are many types of litters to choose from, including clumping, nonclumping and crystals. You might want to experiment a bit to see which type your kitten prefers. The depth of the litter may vary, again, by your kitten’s preferences. But adding more litter is not an alternative to cleaning the box.
    Scoop out any solid wastes at least once a day and change the litter entirely at least once a week. Never throw litter down your drain pipes, as it can cause costly plumbing problems. Avoid using scented litter or strong-smelling cleaners, as these strong odors may repel the kitten.
    If your previously litterbox-trained cat begins to eliminate elsewhere, it may be for a number of reasons, including: You’ve changed litter type, haven’t changed the litter enough, have another cat who is keeping him out, have used a strong-smelling cleanser on the box or have made some other change relating to the litterbox. But it could also be because your cat has a medical problem. When in doubt, always consult your veterinarian.

    This blog is an extension of the one we did earlier this week, but that doesn’t make it any less important! New kittens are usually pretty good, but occasionally you’ll have one that’s a little confused and that’s okay as long as you get them on the right track of course! Never hesitate to swing by the store and pick our Pet Counselors’ brains (they won’t mind!) about tips and tricks for bringing home a new kitten. We also stock many different kinds of litter and litterboxes, as well as foods, treats and toys for your new furry family member. Thanks for reading our blog and we’ll see you in the store soon!

  • 11 Things Your Dog Can See that You Can’t, Wow!

    Most people know dogs can hear and smell things that humans can’t, but did you know there are things you can’t see that your dog can?
    Well, dogs have the tremendous ability to see ultraviolet light, meaning their world is only “ruffly” the same as ours. Because pups can see UV rays, they see a whole lot more than you or I ever could.

    Here are 11 things that make your dog’s world a bigger, brighter place than our own:

    1. Banana spots: While you see a loaf of banana bread in the making, your dog sees something a tad more psychedelic: spots that glow blue. But will he eat a banana when it’s all spotty? That just depends on how ripe he likes his bananas.
    2. Black light anything: Tattoos, T-shirts, toys—if it’s branded as “black light,” your dog doesn’t need a black light to see it. For him, it’s just…light.
    3. Layers in paint: Your dog sees an artist’s every mistake and change of heart, again, because of his ability to see UV light. Maybe bring him along to the flea market next time and use his canine vision to help you spot real (and fake) masterpieces.
    4. More of the night sky: One of the most incredible things for city folks to witness in the countryside is the night sky. There are so many more stars visible out there! (Stupid light pollution.) Yet your dog sees even more stars and celestial bodies right in the city than you do driving out to the sticks.
    5. Security features in money: Your dog would be better at spotting counterfeit money than you—if he had any idea what to look for. Not like he even understands what money is. He thinks treats grow on trees.
    6. Human teeth: If you use a lot of fluoride-based products, your dog probably confuses you for the Cheshire Cat because, to him, it looks like your teeth are glowing. Ditto if you have dental prosthetics.
    7. Quinine: Fingers crossed you’ll never have malaria, which quinine is used to treat. You probably know it from tonic water instead. To dogs, this extract glows blue because of—you guessed it—ultraviolet light.
    8. Lint and hairs: You know how you can pick up a sweater and not notice anything’s on it? But, gradually, as you go about your day, lint and pet hairs begin to surface. Well, your pooch knew those suckers were there all along because of his ability to see UV light and just didn’t tell you. What a jerk.
    9. Pee marks: OK, obviously we can see a fresh puddle of pee on the floor or ground. What your dog sees is the residue left behind when pee hasn’t been fully cleaned from something. (Yuck.) That’s because urine stains also are on the UV wave length.
    10. Their own farts: Really? Yeah, really. (Oh, and this one has nothing to do with UV light.)
    11. The Earth’s magnetic field: Your furry friend aligns himself with the north-south axis every time he pees. That’s because he can actually see the Earth’s magnetic field. Talk about metaphysical.

    Wow, talk about amazing! Dogs are so much more incredible than we give them credit for, well maybe! Thanks for reading our blog and we’ll see you next time!

    Via : http://barkpost.com/things-dogs-can-see/?utm_source=zergnet.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=zergnet_963849

  • 5 Litterbox Mistakes You Could Be Making, Yikes!

    It’s come to my attention that we need more blog posts about our other favorite four legged friends – the kitty cats! While they are not quite as popular a pet as the dog, that doesn’t make them any less special to the owners that love them. Cats, however, are typically easier to take care of that their dog counterparts and require very little for their day-to-day upkeep. But that being said, there is the dreaded litterbox to contend with! Does this situation sound familiar? You head to your kitty’s litterbox to scoop it out and discover that she’s decided to go to the bathroom elsewhere. How frustrating! But don’t blame your cat just yet. She might have a medical condition that needs attention. In fact, the first thing you should do if she’s improperly eliminating is take her to the vet to rule out any medical problems. If it turns out that the issue isn’t health related, then look at other potential reasons. In fact, you might be the cause of her litterbox issues. Oh no! Here’s a list of common mistakes that happen with having a litterbox trained kitty.

    You’re not cleaning her litterbox enough.
    Many cats won’t use the litterbox if it’s not in pristine condition. We know it’s probably not your favorite chore, but you should scoop it out at least twice daily and add more litter as needed. Clean the actual box with baking soda or unscented soap once a week. To make your life a little easier, make a litterbox kit with all the essentials (litter, bags and scoop), so you have everything handy.

    It’s in a less than ideal location.
    Place your cat’s litterbox in an area that’s quiet and away from her resting areas, as well as her food and water bowls. If there’s too much foot traffic or if it’s too close to where she eats, she might opt to go to the bathroom somewhere else. Also consider how much privacy the location offers and how easy it for your cat to access it.

    You don’t have enough litterboxes.
    For many cats, having just one litterbox to use is not going to cut it. Instead follow this general rule: one litterbox per cat plus one. So if you have one cat, you’ll need two litterboxes; two cats need three litterboxes. More boxes might be necessary if your house is large or has multiple floors.

    It’s not big enough.
    When it comes to litterboxes, size matters. A 2014 study conducted by veterinarian and behaviorist Norma Guy found that cats tend to prefer big litterboxes to small ones. Ideally, the litterbox should be at least one and half times the length of the cat’s body (not including the tail). Additionally, cats are not always fans of covered litterboxes, so you should try leaving it uncovered.

    You’re not addressing your cat’s stressors.
    If your cat is missing the litterbox, it could be a sign that she has anxiety. Common stressors are when there is a move or a new baby or new pet in the household. If you have multiple cats, one of them could be bullying your kitty and preventing her from using the litterbox. The stressor could even be more subtle than that. For instance, she might be stressed that you changed to a new type of litter, moved her litterbox to a new location or that the depth of litter has changed. If you’re not sure what’s causing your kitty to miss the litterbox, talk to your veterinarian, who may refer you to a veterinary behaviorist.

    Petland Kennesaw also has a variety of different litterboxes, as well as different foods to try or calming supplements if anxiety is stressing your beloved feline out. Or if we don’t have what you need, ask one of our Pet Counselors if we can special order it for you. We can also be very knowledgeable about cat food and how different brands can affect your cat’s delicate system. That’s all for now, thanks for staying up to date on our blog!

  • Dog Breeds That Are Perfect for Lazy Humans

    While there are people out there that are constantly on the move, running, hiking, being social or having adventures, there are also people who are the exact opposite (which is the category I fall into!). This blog is for the person that would rather stay in and snuggle their pooch on the couch, than go on a three day camping trip on the side of a mountain. So here you go lazies, the best (hopefully) dog breeds for you!

    Havanese: These gentle pups usually don’t weigh more than 15-16 pounds, and travel pretty well (you know, for trips between the couch and the fridge). Smart and small, a Havanese makes a perfect companion dog, and will happily sit in your lap all day if you let it. Which you obviously will.
    Pug: With their smushy faces, curly pig tails, and sassy ‘tudes, Pugs have taken the world by storm. Effortlessly charming and clever, a Pug always knows what it wants — and 99% of the time, that’s doing a whole lot of nothing with their human.
    Chow Chow: Known as the “Fluffy Lion-dog” in China, these snuggly squish balls are loyal, quiet, and independent. Relatively low-energy, Chows happily take to apartment living, and wouldn’t mind if you left them to their own devices once in a while.
    Bloodhound: These large dogs can weigh up to 110 pounds, but are pretty low-energy and don’t require too much grooming. Although these talented pups are known for their sharp nose and tracking abilities, they’re also happy to hunt down the piece of cheese you accidentally just dropped.
    English Bulldog: Docile and loving, English Bulldogs tend to be pretty low energy. They’re charming, affectionate, and don’t require a great deal of walking/running. Their preferred method of exercise is cuddling with you.
    Basset Hound: Sugary sweet and non-confrontational, these goofy pups are blessed with short legs and big ears. By far the most relaxed of all Hound types, this dog tends to be great with children and other animals.
    French Bulldog: The ultimate companion dog, these flat-faced cuties have exploded in popularity. Despite their Insta-famous dog celebrity status, these sweet pups are just as happy to pose for a photoshoot as they are to stay in on a Friday night. Naturally chill and requiring minimal exercise, their favorite pastimes include snoring on a pillow and snuggling up to their favorite human. (That’s you.)
    Chinese Shar-Pei: Sporting deep wrinkles and a short coat, these pups are devoted, reserved, and fabulously fold-y. Their calm nature makes them some of the best dogs for laid-back people. But be warned: you might lose an entire weekend getting lost in those adorable wrinkles.
    Cavalier King Charles Spaniel: These pups often become therapy dogs due to their gentle and affectionate nature. Kind and willing to please, they are perfectly happy with a bit of regular light exercise — a nice walk around the neighborhood or romp in the back yard.
    Great Dane: Originally from Germany, these majestic dogs are surprisingly one of the calmest breeds out there. These gentle giants are perfectly happy with plenty of space and a nice, comfy bed for napping.
    Bullmastiff:
    Despite its size — weighing up to around 130 pounds — these muscular yet sweet protectors are great family dogs. Not meant for timid owners, these pups thrive in a loving but firm home.

    Of course, this is only the short list! All joking aside, there are so many different breeds to choose from out there and we think that there is a perfect one for everybody. At Petland Kennesaw, we specialize in being able to match the right pet the right person and meeting the needs of both! Whether you fall into the lazy category or you lead a more active lifestyle, having the right breed of dog will make everyone happy. Thanks again for taking the time to read over our blog, until next time, have fun lounging on your couch!

  • 7 Ways to Keep Your Pup Cool This Summer!

    Summer is an awesome time for long walks, beach runs and enjoying the outdoors with your furry friend. But while we are pretty clued up on the sun screen and shades combo when it comes to our hooman sun safety, it’s also important that we take care of our pup’s needs when making the most of the weather. So here’s our tips for how to help your pooch beat the heat.

    1. Take fresh water on walks
    Always take a cold bottle of water along with you on walks. Keeping well hyrdrated is essential on a hot day, so fresh water should be in plentiful supply. If your dog is panting or seems sluggish, make sure to take regular breaks in a shaded space and give your pooch a drink. Avoid giving your pup too much exercise when the heat is high as overdoing it is a common cause of heatstroke.

    2. Have your dog’s fur groomed
    Just like we tend to opt for more manageable hair styles in the summer months, our pooches need a restyle too. A dog’s undercoat is part of their natural cooling system, but if not properly groomed it can become matted and prevent airflow across your dog’s skin. Remember not to have their fur completely removed, though, as the bare skin could burn in the sun.

    3. Never leave your dog in a parked car
    Leaving a pet in a car in warm weather is illegal in many states, and it’s easy to see why. The temperature rises fast and the enclosed space could lead your pooch to panic. If travelling in a car with your dog, make sure to use your air-conditioning or leave the windows open to get in as much fresh air as possible.

    4. Give cold treats
    One of our favorite ways to cool off in the sun is to snack on ice cream, and your pup doesn’t have to miss out on the fun. Chilled or frozen treats are a fun surprise for dogs and can help relieve boredom as well as conquer the heat.

    5. Avoid midday walks
    Try to stick to the coolness of morning and evening walks when the weather is hot, letting your pup spend the hottest part of the day indoors. Choose shaded routes where the pavement will be a lot more comfortable on their paws and the heat less intense. If your dog will be outside in a garden during this part of the day, be sure to provide a covered porch space or kennel for your pooch to take a break from the heat.

    6. Wet your pup’s feet
    Dogs tend to cool themselves from the bottom upwards, so wetting their feet will help control their temperature. You could invest in a cooling pad or set up a kiddie splash pool in the garden to allow your dog a little paddle on warm days.

    7. Protect your dog from sunburn
    Sunburn is especially common in fair and short-haired breeds. If your pup is a sun worshiper or is set to be out in the heat for a prolonged period, apply dog-friendly sunscreen to their nose, ears, belly, groin and inside legs. If you’re struggling to find a dog-specific sunscreen, opt for one that’s fit for human babies or sensitive skin. Make sure to check with your vet if unsure on treatment choices.

    Thank you for reading our summer fun blog! We took a little vacation last week, but the rest of this week will be filled with cool treats to help keep your pooch cool and happy this summer!

    Via: http://barkpost.com/discover/pup-cool-summer/