Posts Tagged ‘dogs’

  • The Most Popular Dog Names of 2015!

    When you choose the name of your new puppy, what comes to mind? Is it your favorite character on Game of Thrones or the name of your favorite flower (Lily! Daisy!)? Let’s face it, naming your new family member is a big responsibility and you want to make sure the name fits the personality. Check out this list of popular names to see if any of these work for you and your pooch!

    Rover.com — known as the nation’s Airbnb for dogs! — calculated the top dog names for the year, and the trends they’ve seen throughout 2015. Firstly, people are turning to human names more than ever before with 49% of pups that have come through their site with names that are more common for people.

    Here are the top names for boy dogs:

    1. Max
    2. Charlie
    3. Buddy
    4. Cooper
    5. Jack
    6. Rocky
    7. Toby
    8. Duke
    9. Bear
    10. Tucker

    Pop Culture is dominating the doggy name game, with a major increase over the last year of dogs named after characters from The Hunger Games, and a slight increase for Harry Potter and Star Wars. While still popular, The Walking Dead, Twilight and Game of Thrones-inspired names saw about a 3% decline.

    Now for the ladies:

    1. Bella
    2. Lucy
    3. Daisy
    4. Molly
    5. Lola
    6. Sadie
    7. Maggie
    8. Sophie
    9. Chloe
    10. Bailey

    Did your pup’s name make the list? Or maybe one of these names float your boat? We sure hope so! Thank you for being a loyal member of our blog and customer of our store, we hope to see you soon!

  • 10 Must-Haves for Your New Puppy Checklist!

    You are now the proud caregiver of a new puppy! Over the next several weeks, months, and years you’ll come to learn and experience so many wonderful things. But one of the keys to success is preparation. Make sure you have these puppy checklist items on hand before you’re distracted by a licking, happy ball of fur in the house.

    1. Dog Food

    Growing puppies need a dog food that is specially formulated for their developmental stage— the “puppy” life stage. Puppies need certain nutrients to grow strong bones and muscles, to feed their developing brains, and to build their immune systems without overdoing it on the calorie count. Look for large breed puppy foods for puppies which will be 55 pounds or more once fully grown as an adult.

    2. Dog Treats

    Dog treats are the highlight of a puppy’s day. They can make dog training a snap and improve the human-puppy bond through a positive reinforcement program. However, because it’s easy to overdo, make sure dog treats are small enough to be a tiny bite of flavor … not a meal replacement. In fact, treats should not account for more than 10 percent of your puppy’s daily calories.

    3. Dog Toys

    Teething puppies have an intrinsic need to chew. If you don’t have an adequate supply of dog chew toys on hand, you can kiss your shoes, purses, and furniture goodbye. Inappropriate chewing is annoying, expensive, and possibly even dangerous, so set your puppy up for success with dog-appropriate chew toys.

    4. Bedding

    Puppies should have a safe, comfortable, clean spot to sleep. Many owners find crate training an indispensable tool in the house training process, and this solves the problem of both house training and a designated slumber spot.

    5. Dog Gates (or Pens)

    Dog gates are an excellent way to block doorways to rooms you’d like to keep off-limits to your puppy. Some may even be configured as a personal play pen.

    6. Cleaning Supplies

    Puppies are messy, no two ways about it. They rip things up. They have “accidents” (hint: enzymatic cleaners are very helpful in these cases). They sometimes vomit on the rug. A good supply of cleaning supplies is indispensable. However, choose cleansers that are designated “pet safe” to ensure that even if Fido sneaks a lick, it won’t be a problem for him or for you.

    7. Grooming Supplies

     Your puppy will certainly be in need of a bath at some point. You will need one specific to dogs, as their sensitive skin is easily irritated by the stripping cleansers in shampoos designated for people. Have a good brush on hand as well to get your puppy used to being groomed and to keep their puppy coat in tip top shape. Brushing helps keep the coat shiny and healthy by spreading the oils in their skin through the coat.

    8. Leash

    Dogs aren’t born knowing how to walk on a leash. Training them to get used to a dog leash (and collar) early is an essential socialization skill. For young dogs still learning manners, make sure your leash is short enough that they will be in your control and save the long leashes for when they are a bit older. If you have a small dog — under 20 pounds — you may also want a travel carrier.

    9. Collar

    Dog collars should be snug enough that your puppy dog can’t back out of them, but large enough for 2-3 fingers to slip comfortably underneath. Remember, a growing dog will need a new collar several times during the puppy stage as he or she gets bigger.

    10. Dental Care

    People often don’t think about starting dental care at the puppy stage, but it’s really the only time to start! Getting your puppy used to brushing their teeth and/or using water based tarter control is much easier than getting an adult dog to let you root around in their mouths! And having a set routine for your dog’s dental care will only save you money and time in the future by not having expensive teeth cleanings or (eek!) tooth removal at your veterinarian’s office.

    Well, that will about do our essential puppy checklist! Here at Petland, we specialize in making sure you have everything you need to be successful for your new puppy as well as all the extra supplies they need as they grow into adulthood. And you don’t have to purchase a puppy from us to be able to enjoy how knowledgeable and friendly our Pet Counselors can be when it comes to all things four-legged (or feathery!) So come on down to our store today!

     

  • Are You and Your Pooch Good Neighbors? Check Out These 5 Tips for Making Sure!

    Sure, you and your dog are perfect housemates. You give Fido food, and the pooch gives you snuggles. Sounds like it all works out. But are you and your pup good neighbors? If you’re not sure if the folks on your block would say yes, then check out this list and see if you do these things.

    1. “No poop left behind” should be your mantra.
    Never ever leave your dog poop just lying around, like little smelly minefields waiting to find shoe victims. Not only is it bad for the environment, but not cleaning up after your dog is just a crappy thing to do and sure to get you on your neighbor’s naughty list.

    2. Teach your pooch some manners!
    You’re bound to pass some people on your walk who love your dog and want to say hi. But not everyone does (though we don’t understand why). Teach your dog not to bark, growl, jump on, or hump passersby. Consider an obedience school. A little training goes a long way.

    3. Stay in bounds.
    For the love of dog, don’t let your canine roam the neighborhood. Also, if you use a retractable leash, don’t let your dog get too far from you. It will be harder to properly supervise if Fido isn’t nearby.

    4. Keep the peace.
    There could be a lot of reasons why your dog barks all day, but none of them are going to please your neighborhood when they have to listen to it. Assess the situation and act accordingly. If you have a high-energy dog, you might need to take longer walks or hire someone to walk the dog walk you’re away. If your pooch has separation anxiety, talk to your vet and trainer about the best way to handle the situation. Consider a doggy daycare.

    5. Introduce yourself and your pooch.
    When you make an introduction, you’ll be able to find out how your neighbor feels about dogs and if they have any concerns. And should your dog ever escape, you’ll have another set of eyes in the neighborhood. Assure your neighbor they can come to you at any time with concerns.

    Don’t forget that Petland works with the best dog training companies around! If your pooch needs a little extra (or a lot extra!) training to keep you in your neighbors good graces, never hesitate to stop by and let us give you tips or refer a trainer. We also carry a ton of training treats or toys to keep your pet occupied while you’re away, we’ve got what you need! Good luck, and may your neighbors give your pooch lots of belly rubs!

  • Summer Bathing, Are You Doing It Right?

    For most of us, taking a shower or bath is usually a calming experience. For our pets, however, bathing may be anything but relaxing. Between the water, the noise, the confinement, the scrubbing and the suds, it’s no wonder why your cat or dog may sprint in the other direction of the tub. Unfortunately, grooming our pets is a necessary evil. It minimizes shedding, keeps your pet’s coat healthy, reduces allergies, decreases chances of infection and diminishes the spread of dirt and germs throughout your home. While your dog or cat may never willingly jump under the faucet, you can make bath time as positive, easy and fast an experience as possible by avoiding these common mistakes:

    Wrong Water Temperature
    Shoot for lukewarm water, says Jocelyn Robles, a professional groomer at Holiday House Pet Resort, a veterinarian-owned pet resort and training center in Doylestown, Pa. Water that’s too hot or too cold will create a negative stimulus for your pet, which may turn them off of bath time for the long haul. So how do you know it’s the right temperature? Spray the nozzle on your forearm first, just like you would if you were giving a baby a bath, Robles says. The area of skin is more sensitive to temperature than your hands.

    Harsh Spray
    The easiest way to bathe your cat or dog is with a handheld shower head or faucet nozzle in a tub or sink (if you have one, there’s no need to fill the tub or sink with water when you bathe your pet), but the sound of the loud running water combined with the water pressure may frighten and upset your pet. Instead of spraying the water jet straight on to his fur, try to keep your pet calm by letting the water hit the back of your hand first as you move the nozzle across your pet’s body, Robles says. Your dog or cat will feel your comforting touch as opposed to the pounding of the water. Once he is at ease, you can move your hand away—just make sure you get his entire coat wet.

    Wrong Shampoo Selection
    Don’t automatically grab your own shampoo—even if it’s an “all-natural” solution or a mild baby shampoo, Robles says. “A pet’s skin has a different pH balance than humans,” she added. “Your shampoo will be drying to them.” Your veterinarian can help you with product recommendations, but you’ll generally want to look for brands that are specifically formulated for cats or dogs and follow the directions for shampooing on the label. Oatmeal-based shampoos are a gentle option. Medicated shampoos are an essential part of treating many skin conditions. Ask your veterinarian which might be right for your dog or cat. If your pet has sensitive skin, test the shampoo on a patch on the back of his leg first, and then look for any signs of irritation a couple days before a bath.

    Poor Soap Application
    You may want to apply soap to your pet’s fur and then let it “soak in” for a couple minutes, but you won’t remove all the dirt and oil that way, Robles says. You need to agitate the shampoo to trap the grime and wash it away. Actively massage the soap into your dog or cat’s fur with your hands and fingers for four minutes. Start with your pet’s legs and work your way up to his face (the most sensitive area), Robles says. Clean his face with a cotton ball or washcloth and be careful to avoid his eyes. Wash the outside of his ears with a tiny bit of shampoo on your fingers, a washcloth or a cotton ball. Tilt your pet’s head down before rinsing (for instance, if you’re washing his left ear, angle the left side of his head down) to keep water from going into the ear canal and to prevent ear infections, Robles says. Pay extra attention to your pet’s paw pads, too, as these areas can sweat and trap odor. Then rinse away the shampoo with the shower nozzle, reversing the order in which you shampooed. Start with your pet’s head this time and then work your way down to his legs. That way, if any soap got in your pet’s eyes, they’ll be rinsed first. Make sure the water runs clear of suds before you finish.

    Bad Brushing Technique
    You should brush your dog or cat before and after a bath, but only if you regularly brush him at least three times a week, Robles says. Brushing can be painful and uncomfortable if there are matts or knots in your pet’s fur. “This can turn grooming into a negative,” she says. “You can’t just brush them out.” If your dog or cat has tangled fur, take him to a professional groomer first, then start a regular brushing routine. This will not only keep your pet’s coat shinier and tangle-free, but also keep him cleaner between baths. For breeds with double coats that shed (such as Labrador Retrievers and German Shepherds), you can brush your pet while he is shampooed to help remove some of the excess undercoat, but for all other breeds, make sure your pet is as dry as possible after the bath and before brushing, Robles said. If his fur is too saturated with water, you’ll only create mats. You can even wait until the next day to brush. A slicker brush and/or long-tooth comb will work best for most breeds. Some de-shedding tools and undercoat rakes have been known to knick the skin and cause infections, so double check all tools with a professional groomer or veterinarian you trust before using them, Robles says. A groomer will also be able to demonstrate the proper way to brush your pet from head to paw.

    Hasty Drying Technique
    Make sure you have towels ready to go before the bath (the last thing you want is a soaking wet pet sprinting through your home!) and, if you own a dog, have a few towels on the floor and one ready to drape over his back in case he wants to shake off during the bath. After a bath most pet owners quickly towel down their pet, but you should try to get the fur as dry as possible, Robles says. Use a towel to gently squeeze the fur and pull out as much water as possible, she said. By the end, your pet should be damp but not dripping wet. You’ll want to leave using a blow dryer or any other type of drying tool to the professional groomer, Robles says. It’s difficult to regulate the temperature of the airflow, which increases the risk of burning your pet’s skin. Plus, most animals are scared of the noise, which may put a damper on the end of an otherwise positive bath time experience.

    Bathing Too Often
    Dogs and cats naturally groom themselves, so you probably don’t need to bathe your pet more than once a month, Robles says. Too many baths can actually strip away the natural oils in your pet’s coat and cause skin irritation. Speak with your veterinarian to determine the best grooming schedule and best type of shampoo for your pet’s breed and activity level.

    Here at Petland, we have a wide variety of shampoos, conditioners, spritzes and grooming tools to help you help your pet happy and healthy this summer! Stop by today!

  • What to do When Your Dog Just. Won’t. Go.

    We’ve all had those mornings. You know the ones – the alarm didn’t go off, your hot water took forever to heat up, you couldn’t find those pants you wanted to wear today and all of a sudden you’re soooo late and all you need is for your dog to stop sniffing around outside and go to the bathroom! Yeah, like I said, we’ve all had one of those. Well, hopefully the tips below will help your pooch get down to business when you need him to. But there’s nothing you can do about the dreaded “nothing goes your way” days!

    1. Make sure your pup’s reluctance to go potty is not a sign of a medical condition. Dogs are smart. They often figure out that once they poop, the walk’s over. But before you accuse your pup of being a manipulative little genius, find out if they’re holding it in because of something more serious. Urinary tract infections are a common cause of urinary retention, and constipation might be stopping up your dog’s bowels. Get the opinion of a trusted vet before you trying any of the methods below.

    2. Find a quiet area and make it a habitual potty spot. Like us, pups prefer to go #1 and #2 in peace. Your dog might be uneasy relieving himself in an area with lots going on. It’s kind of like when you go to the bathroom and someone talks to you through the door and suddenly find yourself with a weird case of bathroom stage fright.

    3. Tummy massage. Never underestimate the power of a gentle tummy rub. Your pup will think he’s just getting a normal belly rub for being a good pup, but soft clockwise motions might help get things moving, if you know what I mean.

    4. Use a command. Most people use “Go poop,” but feel free to get creative. I have also heard of people who say, “Do your business” and “Go potty.” The important thing is that your pup knows it’s go time when you say the magic words so you’re not walking up and down the same street for an entire hour because your pooch thinks you’re just going for a normal walk.

    5. Get that cute booty moving! When housetraining, owners are advised to take their pup outside or to a fresh puppy pad immediately after playtime, because all that horsing around encourages your pup to let loose! Taking a quick jog around the neighborhood or playing a game of fetch might be just what your dog needs to finally go.

    We hope that these tips will be effective the next your pup needs to hurry things along because you need to get out the door! Let us know any tips or tricks that you might have for “potty time” with your puppy, we are always looking for good advice to pass along! Thanks for being a loyal reader of our blogs!

  • 11 Things Your Dog Can See that You Can’t, Wow!

    Most people know dogs can hear and smell things that humans can’t, but did you know there are things you can’t see that your dog can?
    Well, dogs have the tremendous ability to see ultraviolet light, meaning their world is only “ruffly” the same as ours. Because pups can see UV rays, they see a whole lot more than you or I ever could.

    Here are 11 things that make your dog’s world a bigger, brighter place than our own:

    1. Banana spots: While you see a loaf of banana bread in the making, your dog sees something a tad more psychedelic: spots that glow blue. But will he eat a banana when it’s all spotty? That just depends on how ripe he likes his bananas.
    2. Black light anything: Tattoos, T-shirts, toys—if it’s branded as “black light,” your dog doesn’t need a black light to see it. For him, it’s just…light.
    3. Layers in paint: Your dog sees an artist’s every mistake and change of heart, again, because of his ability to see UV light. Maybe bring him along to the flea market next time and use his canine vision to help you spot real (and fake) masterpieces.
    4. More of the night sky: One of the most incredible things for city folks to witness in the countryside is the night sky. There are so many more stars visible out there! (Stupid light pollution.) Yet your dog sees even more stars and celestial bodies right in the city than you do driving out to the sticks.
    5. Security features in money: Your dog would be better at spotting counterfeit money than you—if he had any idea what to look for. Not like he even understands what money is. He thinks treats grow on trees.
    6. Human teeth: If you use a lot of fluoride-based products, your dog probably confuses you for the Cheshire Cat because, to him, it looks like your teeth are glowing. Ditto if you have dental prosthetics.
    7. Quinine: Fingers crossed you’ll never have malaria, which quinine is used to treat. You probably know it from tonic water instead. To dogs, this extract glows blue because of—you guessed it—ultraviolet light.
    8. Lint and hairs: You know how you can pick up a sweater and not notice anything’s on it? But, gradually, as you go about your day, lint and pet hairs begin to surface. Well, your pooch knew those suckers were there all along because of his ability to see UV light and just didn’t tell you. What a jerk.
    9. Pee marks: OK, obviously we can see a fresh puddle of pee on the floor or ground. What your dog sees is the residue left behind when pee hasn’t been fully cleaned from something. (Yuck.) That’s because urine stains also are on the UV wave length.
    10. Their own farts: Really? Yeah, really. (Oh, and this one has nothing to do with UV light.)
    11. The Earth’s magnetic field: Your furry friend aligns himself with the north-south axis every time he pees. That’s because he can actually see the Earth’s magnetic field. Talk about metaphysical.

    Wow, talk about amazing! Dogs are so much more incredible than we give them credit for, well maybe! Thanks for reading our blog and we’ll see you next time!

    Via : http://barkpost.com/things-dogs-can-see/?utm_source=zergnet.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=zergnet_963849

  • Dog Breeds That Are Perfect for Lazy Humans

    While there are people out there that are constantly on the move, running, hiking, being social or having adventures, there are also people who are the exact opposite (which is the category I fall into!). This blog is for the person that would rather stay in and snuggle their pooch on the couch, than go on a three day camping trip on the side of a mountain. So here you go lazies, the best (hopefully) dog breeds for you!

    Havanese: These gentle pups usually don’t weigh more than 15-16 pounds, and travel pretty well (you know, for trips between the couch and the fridge). Smart and small, a Havanese makes a perfect companion dog, and will happily sit in your lap all day if you let it. Which you obviously will.
    Pug: With their smushy faces, curly pig tails, and sassy ‘tudes, Pugs have taken the world by storm. Effortlessly charming and clever, a Pug always knows what it wants — and 99% of the time, that’s doing a whole lot of nothing with their human.
    Chow Chow: Known as the “Fluffy Lion-dog” in China, these snuggly squish balls are loyal, quiet, and independent. Relatively low-energy, Chows happily take to apartment living, and wouldn’t mind if you left them to their own devices once in a while.
    Bloodhound: These large dogs can weigh up to 110 pounds, but are pretty low-energy and don’t require too much grooming. Although these talented pups are known for their sharp nose and tracking abilities, they’re also happy to hunt down the piece of cheese you accidentally just dropped.
    English Bulldog: Docile and loving, English Bulldogs tend to be pretty low energy. They’re charming, affectionate, and don’t require a great deal of walking/running. Their preferred method of exercise is cuddling with you.
    Basset Hound: Sugary sweet and non-confrontational, these goofy pups are blessed with short legs and big ears. By far the most relaxed of all Hound types, this dog tends to be great with children and other animals.
    French Bulldog: The ultimate companion dog, these flat-faced cuties have exploded in popularity. Despite their Insta-famous dog celebrity status, these sweet pups are just as happy to pose for a photoshoot as they are to stay in on a Friday night. Naturally chill and requiring minimal exercise, their favorite pastimes include snoring on a pillow and snuggling up to their favorite human. (That’s you.)
    Chinese Shar-Pei: Sporting deep wrinkles and a short coat, these pups are devoted, reserved, and fabulously fold-y. Their calm nature makes them some of the best dogs for laid-back people. But be warned: you might lose an entire weekend getting lost in those adorable wrinkles.
    Cavalier King Charles Spaniel: These pups often become therapy dogs due to their gentle and affectionate nature. Kind and willing to please, they are perfectly happy with a bit of regular light exercise — a nice walk around the neighborhood or romp in the back yard.
    Great Dane: Originally from Germany, these majestic dogs are surprisingly one of the calmest breeds out there. These gentle giants are perfectly happy with plenty of space and a nice, comfy bed for napping.
    Bullmastiff:
    Despite its size — weighing up to around 130 pounds — these muscular yet sweet protectors are great family dogs. Not meant for timid owners, these pups thrive in a loving but firm home.

    Of course, this is only the short list! All joking aside, there are so many different breeds to choose from out there and we think that there is a perfect one for everybody. At Petland Kennesaw, we specialize in being able to match the right pet the right person and meeting the needs of both! Whether you fall into the lazy category or you lead a more active lifestyle, having the right breed of dog will make everyone happy. Thanks again for taking the time to read over our blog, until next time, have fun lounging on your couch!

  • Where to Shop: 27 Stores That Are Pet Friendly

    As summer is fully upon us and the opportunity to leave your pooch in the car for a quick errand is past, these stores have fully jumped on the pet bandwagon and will allow you to bring your pet in for that quick shopping experience. And while most pet stores (including ours) and pet supply stores (also including ours) are a no-brainer for being able to bring your pet in, some of these other places you might not have guessed are pet friendly! Please enjoy, and hopefully frequent, the following list:

    Abercrombie & Fitch
    Michael’s
    Hobby Lobby
    Ross
    Sephora
    Ann Taylor/Ann Taylor Loft
    Tiffany & Co.
    Bath & Body Works
    Hallmark
    Home Depot
    Pottery Barn
    Macy’s
    Bass Pro Shops
    Barnes & Noble
    LUSH Cosmetics (their products are also famously not tested on animals, I highly recommend them!)
    Gap
    Bloomingdale’s
    Urban Outfitters
    Anthropologie
    Free People
    Foot Locker
    Bebe
    Nordstroms
    Old Navy
    Sacks Fifth Avenue
    Tractor Supply Co.
    The Apple Store

    We thoroughly hope this list helps out next time you have your pup in tow and need to make a stop, or even if you want to work on how your pet behaves in an outside environment for training purposes. As I said above, our Petland Kennesaw store welcomes pets of all shapes and sizes, fur or feathers! As always, thank you for reading our blog!

  • 5 Frozen Homemade Dog Treats for Your Cool Pup!

    With summer being upon us and the temperatures continuing to rise, we need to be extra diligent in making sure our pups stay cool and hydrated! Earlier this week, we had a blog about tricks and tips for keeping your dog cool and one of those tricks was using frozen treats. Now for those feeling extra adventurous, skip the store bought frozen treats and make your own with these seven recipes, I guarantee you, your pup will be overjoyed!

    1. Peanut Butter & Apple Pupsicles:
    Ingredients:
    2 containers (6 oz. each) plain yogurt
    2 tablespoons honey
    2 tablespoons peanut butter
    1/3 cup regular applesauce (or a 4 oz. snack size portion)

    Instructions:
    Stir together all ingredients in a mixing bowl with a spoon until well combined. Divide mixture into small paper or plastic cups (or ice cube trays for bite-sized treats) and freeze for about 3-4 hours. Loosen treat by holding cup under warm water from the faucet and serve.

    Via: http://zimonawhim.com/2012/04/20/homemade-frozen-dog-treats-pupsicles/

    2. Frozen Yogurt & Berry Bones:
    Ingredients
    1/2 cup whole Blueberries
    1 cup chopped Strawberries
    1 cup plain Yogurt

    Directions
    1. Combine all ingredients until mixed.
    2. Pour into molds (we used bone shaped, but any will do!) and freeze for at least 4 to 5 hours before serving.

    Via: http://doggydessertchef.com/2013/09/02/strawberry-blueberry-yogurt/

    3. Frozen Star Shaped Treats:
    Ingredients:
    1 cup water
    8 strawberries
    1/4 cup blueberries

    Instructions:
    Rinse fruit and cut stems off the strawberries. Mix 1/2 cup water along with all the strawberries in a blender until liquefied. Repeat with the blueberries. Pour mixture into star shaped ice cube trays (you can always use regular ice cube trays, but the ones with shapes are so cute!) Let freeze 2-4 hours at least.

    Via: http://irresistiblepets.net/2012/08/diy-frozen-star-dog-treats/

    4. PB&J Pops:
    Ingredients
    1/4 cup Peanut Butter
    2 cups Strawberries, chopped (frozen or fresh)
    1/2 cup Blueberries (frozen or fresh)
    1 3/4 cup plain Yogurt, divided
    4 Rawhide Sticks

    First Layer
    1/4 cup Peanut Butter
    3/4 cup plain Yogurt
    Add peanut butter and yogurt to a blender or food processor and blend until smooth

    Second Layer
    2 cups Strawberries, chopped
    1/4 cup plain Yogurt
    Add strawberries and yogurt to a blender or food processor and blend until smooth

    Third Layer
    1/2 cup Blueberries
    3/4 cup plain Yogurt
    Mix blueberries and yogurt

    Directions
    1. Pour an inch or so of your first layer mixture into the bottom of each cup.
    2. Allow to freeze for 30 minutes, and insert your rawhide stick.
    3. Repeat pouring the layers, allowing them to set 30 minutes in between, until they are all used.
    4. Freeze for 8 hours to allow them to fully set.
    5. Run warm water around the mold to remove the popsicle.
    Makes 4 popsicles.

    Via: http://doggydessertchef.com/2012/05/28/pbj-pops/

    5. Frozen Peanut Butter & Yogurt Heart Treats:
    Ingredients:
    Plain organic Greek yogurt
    Natural peanut butter
    Heart shaped ice cube tray

    Directions:
    Spoon a small amount of peanut butter into the base of the ice tray. You can heat up the peanut butter first to make it easier (and not so messy) to spoon in. The more you add, the thicker the top layer on the treats will appear. Next up, dollop heaping spoonfuls of the yogurt to cover the peanut butter in each mold. Press yogurt down into the molds using the back of your spoon to make sure they’re packed. This will help seal the peanut butter and yogurt together in the final treat. You can even gently “drop” the tray a few times in order to encourage further settling. If you have excess yogurt in any of the molds, gently scoop away until level with mold and pop into the freezer for at least 4 hours and then pop out of tray for a cool summer treat!

    Via: http://www.17apart.com/2014/02/valentines-pets-diy-natural-frozen-dog.html

    As with anything that your dog consumes, make sure you supervise after you give them one of these treats to make sure your pup doesn’t react badly to them. If your pup is sensitive to certain foods or is on a special diet, double check with your vet before making any treats that might not be the best thing for them. And if you end up making some and they are a hit, please let us know! Thanks so much for taking the time to read our blog, we really appreciate it!

  • 7 Ways to Keep Your Pup Cool This Summer!

    Summer is an awesome time for long walks, beach runs and enjoying the outdoors with your furry friend. But while we are pretty clued up on the sun screen and shades combo when it comes to our hooman sun safety, it’s also important that we take care of our pup’s needs when making the most of the weather. So here’s our tips for how to help your pooch beat the heat.

    1. Take fresh water on walks
    Always take a cold bottle of water along with you on walks. Keeping well hyrdrated is essential on a hot day, so fresh water should be in plentiful supply. If your dog is panting or seems sluggish, make sure to take regular breaks in a shaded space and give your pooch a drink. Avoid giving your pup too much exercise when the heat is high as overdoing it is a common cause of heatstroke.

    2. Have your dog’s fur groomed
    Just like we tend to opt for more manageable hair styles in the summer months, our pooches need a restyle too. A dog’s undercoat is part of their natural cooling system, but if not properly groomed it can become matted and prevent airflow across your dog’s skin. Remember not to have their fur completely removed, though, as the bare skin could burn in the sun.

    3. Never leave your dog in a parked car
    Leaving a pet in a car in warm weather is illegal in many states, and it’s easy to see why. The temperature rises fast and the enclosed space could lead your pooch to panic. If travelling in a car with your dog, make sure to use your air-conditioning or leave the windows open to get in as much fresh air as possible.

    4. Give cold treats
    One of our favorite ways to cool off in the sun is to snack on ice cream, and your pup doesn’t have to miss out on the fun. Chilled or frozen treats are a fun surprise for dogs and can help relieve boredom as well as conquer the heat.

    5. Avoid midday walks
    Try to stick to the coolness of morning and evening walks when the weather is hot, letting your pup spend the hottest part of the day indoors. Choose shaded routes where the pavement will be a lot more comfortable on their paws and the heat less intense. If your dog will be outside in a garden during this part of the day, be sure to provide a covered porch space or kennel for your pooch to take a break from the heat.

    6. Wet your pup’s feet
    Dogs tend to cool themselves from the bottom upwards, so wetting their feet will help control their temperature. You could invest in a cooling pad or set up a kiddie splash pool in the garden to allow your dog a little paddle on warm days.

    7. Protect your dog from sunburn
    Sunburn is especially common in fair and short-haired breeds. If your pup is a sun worshiper or is set to be out in the heat for a prolonged period, apply dog-friendly sunscreen to their nose, ears, belly, groin and inside legs. If you’re struggling to find a dog-specific sunscreen, opt for one that’s fit for human babies or sensitive skin. Make sure to check with your vet if unsure on treatment choices.

    Thank you for reading our summer fun blog! We took a little vacation last week, but the rest of this week will be filled with cool treats to help keep your pooch cool and happy this summer!

    Via: http://barkpost.com/discover/pup-cool-summer/